Texas Liberal

All People Matter

Bill White Says Jolanda Jones Only Represents Certain People—I Wonder What He Might Be Implying With This Assertion?

Democrat Bill White’s offensive letter endorsing Republican Jack Christie in the runoff for Houston Council At-Large #5  says “As an At-Large member of City Council Jack will represent all his constituents…he will listen to every point of view.”

(Above–Councilwoman Jones with citizens she’ll be representing to your detriment.) 

When you are publicly and brazenly ditching one of the core constituencies that got you elected Mayor of Houston and who supported you strongly for Governor, why bother with code words in any respect?

And just so you don’t think I’m making this line of attack up by former Mayor White, here is what he says on a mailer sent out by the Christie campaign

“Jack understands and values the diversity of Houston. As an At-Large member of City Council he will represent all his constituents, not principally those who voted for him on election day.”

Sure.

If it is not racial, than what is it? Economic status? Certain neighborhoods in Houston?

In any case, Mayor White says you are getting short-changed at City Hall by these unnamed others.

The Democrats in the two At-Large Council races in our 61% Obama 2008 city of Houston are Kristi Thibaut in #2 and Jolanda Jones in #5.

Mr. Christie makes things up. As I’ve learned first hand, you can’t trust the things he says. 

Early voting in this election is over. General Election Day is Saturday, December 10.

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December 8, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Texas Liberal Endorsements For 2010 In Houston, Harris County & Texas

(Blogger’s Note—With Election Day tomorrow, I’m rerunning this post from last week.)

Here is the Texas Liberal endorsement post for the 2010 general election.

(Above–The red is the City of Houston within Harris County, Texas.  In the upper right is Harris County in Texas.)

Where possible, I am voting the straight Democratic ticket.

In the case of the office of the State Comptroller, I am voting for Green candidate Edward Lindsay. There is no Democrat in this race. If the Green gets 5% in this race, then Greens get automatic ballot access in Texas in 2012. I want the option of Green Candidates on the ballot.  Texans merit a choice that will consistently advocate for social justice and fair play. Hopefully the Greens can grow into this role in cases where Democrats let voters down.

(Blogger’s Note —I voted for Mr. Lindsay in early voting. Since that time, Mr. Lindsay’s ability to hold the office has come into question. You’ll have to figure out for yourself what course is best in this matter. It is a frustrating situation.)

I am voting Yes on Houston Proposition 1 in favor of the job-creating Renew Houston. This issue will help address our flooding problems in Houston.

I am voting Yes on Houston Proposition 2. This issue will help manage the Houston City Council redistricting process more fairly for incumbents not sure where their new district lines are drawn.

I am voting Yes on Houston Proposition 3. A yes vote in on Issue 3 will help save lives on our already dangerous streets by keeping our red light cameras.

I’m not voting the Democratic ticket with a full measure of enthusiasm. I’ve lived in a city everyday of my 43 years. Democrats sometimes take advantage  of the loyal support of urban voters and offer little in return. It is really little different from how Republicans take the majority of rural votes in our nation, yet at the same time offer few solutions to the many problems of rural America.

While I do believe that former Houston Mayor Bill White will be a much better Governor than the incumbent, I’m disappointed that he has not put forth a vision that includes all Texans. We live in what is many ways a poor state. Yet the poor frequently seem shunned by the modern Democratic Party. Continue reading

November 1, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The 2010 Texas Liberal General Election Endorsement Slate

Here is the Texas Liberal endorsement post for the 2010 general election.

(Above–The red is the City of Houston within Harris County, Texas.  In the upper right is Harris County in Texas.)

Where possible, I am voting the straight Democratic ticket.

In the case of the office of the State Comptroller, I am voting for Green candidate Edward Lindsay. There is no Democrat in this race. If the Green gets 5% in this race, then Greens get automatic ballot access in Texas in 2012. I want the option of Green Candidates on the ballot.  Texans merit a choice that will consistently advocate for social justice and fair play. Hopefully the Greens can grow into this role in cases where Democrats let voters down.

(Blogger’s Note —I voted for Mr. Lindsay in early voting. Since that time, Mr. Lindsay’s ability to hold the office has come into question. You’ll have to figure out for yourself  what course is best in this matter. It is a frustrating situation.)

I am  voting Yes on Houston Proposition 1 in favor of the job-creating Renew Houston. This issue will help address our flooding problems in Houston.

I am voting Yes on Houston Proposition 2. This issue will help manage the Houston City Council redistricting process more fairly for incumbents not sure where their new district lines are drawn.

I am voting Yes on Houston Proposition 3. A yes vote in on Issue 3 will help save lives on our already dangerous streets by keeping our red light cameras.

I’m not voting the Democratic ticket with a full measure of enthusiasm. I’ve lived in a city everyday of my 43 years. Democrats sometimes take advantage  of the loyal support of urban voters and offer little in return. It is really little different from how Republicans take the majority of rural votes in our nation, yet at the same time offer few solutions to the many problems of rural America.

While I do believe that former Houston Mayor Bill White will be a much better Governor than the incumbent, I’m disappointed that he has not put forth a vision that includes all Texans. We live in what is many ways a poor state. Yet the poor frequently seem shunned by the modern Democratic Party.

However, it should also be noted that the Democratic nominee for Lt. Governor of Texas, Linda Chavez-Thompson, has offered a very inclusive view of who should share in the blessings of freedom and prosperity in our state.

In Harris County, Loren Jackson has done a great job modernizing and bringing new efficiencies to the office of Harris County District Clerk.

The entire Democratic slate for countywide offices is competent. And at least two of the Republicans running for countywide office are so-called Tea Party followers.

The Tea Party is not something we need in our Harris County.

In Texas Congressional District 7, located in the Houston-area, there is a write-in Democratic candidate against the Republican incumbent. Her name is Lissa Squiers. The incumbent is not running unopposed.

I am not endorsing any Republicans. It is possible a case could be made for the reelection of Harris County Judge Executive Ed Emmett. Mr. Emmett is a reasonable voice who brings some moderation to the Republican Party in a way that likely benefits the County as a whole.

Top conservative blogger Dave Jennings at Big Jolly Politics, endorsed Democrat Jeff Weems to serve on the Texas Railroad Commission. Mr. Jennings did this despite the fact he is Tea Party mouthpiece.

I cannot in this political climate endorse a Republican. It is not enough that Mr. Emmett is not a kook. Silence in the face of extremism is very much a vice. The present day Republican/Tea Party talking points of drastically scaled back government and racial and ethnic intolerance simply have nothing of relevance to say to our growing and diverse county.  Mr. Emmett needs to speak up against the rising menace of Tea Party extremism.

I urge all to vote in the upcoming election. Please vote for all the offices right down to the last judicial and county race.

Here are some links to facts about the election—

Here is the Democratic Party of Texas.

Here is the Green Party of Texas. ( I note that this web page has no update newer than July 23. I really want to be supportive, but are these people serious or not?)

Here is the Harris County Democratic Party.

Blogger Charles Kuffner has interviewed scores of Democrats on the ballot. Listen to these interviews and hear the candidates for yourself.

For those of you who insist on considering the Republicans on the ballot, the League of Women Voters of the Houston area has all the facts.

Here are the endorsements of the Houston Chronicle.

If you have a candidate you think is worthy of mention here, please go ahead and leave a comment.

October 22, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Harris County Judge Edition Of Which Of These Is Less Like The Others?

Here is a “which of these is less like the other” game from Texas Liberal.

Today’s game focuses on the race for Harris County Judge Executive.

We’ll warm up for the main act with a test question featuring the train cars you see above.  I took this picture a few hours ago in the area of Navigation Blvd. in Houston.

Which of these three train cars is less like the other two?

We can see that the one in the middle is the only one of the three train cars that is not cylindrical in shape. It is also the only one that is blue.

The one in the middle is also the only one covered in graffiti.

Okay. I think we get the idea. Let’s try another picture connected to the race for Harris County Judge Executive. This picture is also one that I took today.

Above we see three campaign signs on prominent display at the building of International Longshoreman‘s Association Local No. 24.

Which of these three signs is less like the other two?

Well…All three of the signs are for candidates on the ballot in 2010. And I’ll bet that all three have been endorsed by International Longshoreman’s Association Local No.24.

So I would say that the big difference here is that County Judge Ed Emmett is a Republican while U.S. Rep. Gene Green and Texas gubernatorial candidate Bill White are Democrats.

It seems that the Longshoreman don’t think much of Democrat Gordon Quan’s chances of beating Mr. Emmett.

Mr. Emmett has the support of unions and of the so-called Tea Party. That is very skillful of him.

It is rough out there. Where is the love for Mr. Quan?

I’m voting for Mr. Quan in this race. Harris County would be better served with Democratic control of our Commissioner’s Court.

Don’t give up before the votes are counted!

October 15, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Governor Perry Awarded State Funds To Big Campaign Donor In Way Outside Of Normal Process

Texas Governor Rick Perry awarded $4.5 million in taxpayer money to a top campaign donor in a way outside of normal state procedures.

From the Dallas Morning News

“Gov. Rick Perry acknowledged Wednesday that he has a “nice, close personal relationship” with a major campaign donor whose company was awarded $4.5 million in state technology funds despite its failure to win approval from a regional screening board.  Perry was responding to disclosures this week by The Dallas Morning News that the award from the Emerging Technology Fund to Convergen did not follow the normal reviewing track. Although Convergen’s application for funds was not recommended by a regional board, it was allowed to proceed for approval to a statewide advisory committee appointed by Perry.”

Click the above link and read the story. See what you think. I’m a ideological partisan, but I feel the case can be made that Rick Perry has been in office for too long and that he does not put the best interests of Texans first.

Click here to learn about Bill White for Texas Governor.

October 14, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Candidates For Governor Of Texas Debate Education–An Eyewitness Report

I attended the League of Women Voters of the Houston Area Texas Governor’s race debate held on Sunday, October 3 here in Houston.

The debate was held at the Harris County Department of Education building you see pictured above. As you will note in the picture, this education building is named after Ronald Reagan.

That would be funny if the joke were not on all of us.

Three of the four candidates for Governor of Texas took part in this debate.

The three in attendance were—

Democratic nominee Bill White.

Green nominee Deborah Shafto.

Libertarian nominee and scary person Kathie Glass.

Not attending the debate was incumbent Republican Governor Rick Perry.

Governor Perry does not believe that the people of Texas merit the chance to see and compare all the candidates in one place and at one time.

The focus of the debate was education. There was a warm-up panel of three Harris County school superintendents to discuss education issues in Texas.

So the event was really something of a double feature.

(Below—Double Feature.)

The three local superintendents all agreed that educating kids is a challenge. They all agreed that kids must take many standardized tests, but that they sought to educate kids beyond the tests. They all agreed that money is tight. They all agreed that they agreed.

A top Houston and Texas education blogger is Martha Griffin who writes musings.

As for the debate, here are some observations—

Bill White spoke to the fact that anybody born in the U.S. is a citizen. This was in response to a question about if the children of undocumented persons should get government services.  Mr. White’s stand is clearly the correct Constitutional view.

Deb Shafto said she would be willing to raise taxes to support education. This is a good position that puts the long-term interests of Texans ahead of short-term politics. Texas has one of the worst drop out rates in the nation.

Angry Kathie Glass said that the number of immigrants coming across the border represented an “Invasion.” If you hold this to be true, it seems to me you’d be justified to do just about anything to repel an “invasion.”

(Below–Invasion.)

Mr. White did not at any point mention poverty or the large number of poor Texans. He may have alluded to the fact of poverty, but he made repeated and clear mention of the middle class. The middle class does indeed need a government that is on their side. Yet at the same time, it is frustrating that in a state as poor as Texas, the former Democratic Mayor of a city with a near 50% child poverty rate did not discuss attacking poverty as an important way of improving education. We need a root and branch approach to education because as it says in Job 18:16

“Their roots will dry up, and their branches will wither.”

Ms. Shafto said that she has been a union member and that she supported teacher’s unions. She said that while she has seen these unions at times pursue things she did not fully agree with, that people have a right to organize and that teachers unions are often good advocates for education.

Extreme Ms. Glass said that she would get rid of truancy laws and that if kids as young as 14 wanted to drop out that they should be allowed to do so.

That is just what she said.

Mr. White said the cost of attending our Texas state universities has gone up a great deal while Rick Perry has been Governor. This is a correct assertion by Mr. White and it is not clear what Governor Perry is going to do about this problem.  Maybe if the Governor had been at the debate, his views on the matter would be more clear.

Ms. Shafto used the analogy of a “jump ball” in basketball to describe how Texas teachers are competing for bonuses. I enjoyed this metaphor. As Sojourner Truth knew, we must sell the shadow to support the substance.

(Below–Jump ball)

Far Out Ms. Glass said that local government control of schools was okay, but that Austin should stay out of the picture to the extent possible.

Yet if the issue for libertarians is the place of government in our lives, local government is still government. If any level of government can be trusted to run something as important as are our schools, why can’t government be trusted to handle a number of responsibilities? Libertarians live in a fantasy world.

All in all, the debate served a useful public purpose. I urge folks to consider all the candidates. In my view, either Mr. White or Ms. Shafto would do a good job for Texas. I will be voting for Mr. White because he will be a far better Governor for the future of Texas than Mr. Perry. 10 years of Rick Perry so far is more than enough.

(Below— The debate stage. This is an approved LWV picture. I followed the rules and did not take any pictures inside the debate hall.)

October 4, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Since He Won’t Debate, What Type Of Empty Chair Should be Set up For Rick Perry?

The League of Women Voters of the Houston Area and the Harris County Department of Education are hosting a debate for our Texas Governor’s Race.

This debate will be held at 6PM Sunday, October 3 at the Harris County Board of Education building located at 6300 Irvington Boulevard in Houston.

(Above–Incumbent Governor Rick perry refuses to debate this year. I think the League should set up an empty chair for the Governor. Above you see a Saddle Chair.  Maybe the Governor would attend if he could imagine himself a cowboy during the debate.)

The debate will be moderated by Melanie Lawson. Her name sounds familiar for those of you who live in Houston because she is an anchorperson on the TV news.

(Above–I think all Texans would enjoy seeing Governor Perry sitting in a Garden Egg chair. This chair was designed in 1968 by Peter Ghyczy.  Photo by Paulscf.)

The Democratic nominee for Governor—Bill White–-and the Green nominee–-Deb Shafto-–are scheduled to attend this debate.

The Libertarian nominee will be there as well. I don’t want to mention that person’s name. If you’re really a Libertarian, you’ll look it up yourself and not count on me to do that for you.

Though if you are a Libertarian, I bet you’ll take Social Security when it is time and I bet you’ll call the local fire department if your house is on fire. It is services for others that Libertarians don’t like.

( Governor Perry might attend the debate if chairs were set up in a palatial setting that reminds Mr. Perry of the $10,000 a month rental home he has been living in since the Governor’s mansion burned down. Picture taken by Hennrik Bennetsen.)

Incumbent Governor Rick Perry will not be at the debate. Mr. Perry is refusing to debate Mr. White and his other opponents.

It is not really so much that Governor Perry is afraid to debate Mr. White.  It is, instead, that Mr. Perry has a small lead in the polls and his base of supporters does not care if he debates or not. It does not serve the Governor to debate. The fact that a debate involving all candidates would serve the democratic process is not so important to the Governor. It is about that is best for Rick Perry instead of what is best for the people of Texas.

(Above–The League could bring a park bench in for the Governor.  Photo taken by James Perry.  Seeing a public asset, the Governor could seek to privatize the bench by selling it to a company that would charge a fee or toll to citizens who wished to sit on the bench.)

Listening to others in a debate can be difficult when your personal and political identity is often rooted in disliking people, and in being afraid of people not like yourself in our minority-majority state. This describes the mindset of many Tea Party/Republican voters in Texas.

By not debating and by refusing to meet with newspaper editorial boards, Mr. Perry helps his supporters live in their own private world.

It is world where Federal Health Care Reform is rejected even though so many in Texas have no health insurance.

(See here all that Health Care Reform does for hard working Americans. These are benefits that any American might require at any time.)

It is a world where treasonous talk of secession from our nation is okay.

It is world where the response to high school drop out rates, is to refuse federal education dollars that are correctly tied to maintaining a consistent level of education funding in upcoming years.

It is not such a nice world.

Hopefully, Mr. Perry will soon come to the realization that the people of Texas deserve to see all the candidates for Governor debating the issues on the same stage.

(Above—The chair Governor Perry merits most for his petulance. Photo taken by Yvwv.)

September 28, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

When Must One Register To Be Able To Vote In Texas In 2010? When Is Election Day?

Who can vote on General Election Day in Texas and in Harris County, Texas? When must one register to vote in order to be eligible? What day is Election Day?

The last day one can register to vote this year is October 4.

The first day of Early Voting across Texas is October 18.

Election Day across Texas is November 2.

Here is a summary of important dates in the upcoming election season.

These are the qualifications for being eligible to vote for all of Texas —

To be eligible to register to vote in Texas, any United States citizen residing in Texas who is:

  • At least 18 years old on Election Day
  • Not a convicted felon (unless sentence, probation and/or parole are completed)
  • Not declared mentally incapacitated by a court of law.

The information below describes how one can register—

Registering to vote is easy in Texas. It doesn’t even require a stamp! Official applications to register to vote are postage-paid by the State of Texas. In most Texas counties, the Tax Assessor-Collector is also the Voter Registrar. In some counties, the County Clerk or Elections Administrator registers voters. You may obtain an application from the county Voter Registrar’s office, the Secretary of State’s Office, libraries, many post offices, high schools and on the web. From our website, you may request that we send you an official, postage-paid application. Or, you may download an informal application, but you will be required to affix a stamp before mailing. You may also register to vote when you apply for or renew your driver’s license.

Read the instructions on the form, fill it out and mail it to the Voter Registrar in your county, or take it to the Voter Registrar’s office in your county. You must be at least 17 years and 10 months of age on the date you apply.

If for any reason you cannot register yourself, with your permission, your spouse, parent or child may fill out and sign an application for you if that person is a registered voter or has applied for voter registration. This person is known as your “agent.”The application must be received in the Voter Registrar’s office or postmarked 30 days before an election in order for you to be eligible to vote in that election. You will receive a voter registration certificate in the mail after the Voter Registrar has processed your voter registration application. Upon receipt of the voter registration certificate, sign it, fold it and keep in it in your wallet and take it to the polls with you when you vote.

All voters who register to vote in Texas must provide a Texas driver’s license number or personal identification number issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety. If you do not have such a number, then you must state that fact and provide the last four digits of your social security number. If you do not have a social security number, you must also state that fact.

These facts come from the office of the Texas Secretary of State. You can click the link for full details.

Here is information about registering to vote in Harris County, Texas. When you register to vote in Harris County, be certain you fill out the registration form correctly without any mistakes. The County Registrar, Leo Vasquez, has often shown himself more concerned  with keeping people from voting than he is in making sure that people are able to vote.

Here is the campaign web page for Bill White for Governor of Texas. Please consider voting for Mr. White. The incumbent Governor is already the longest-serving Governor in the history of Texas. It is time for somebody new.

September 16, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bill White Does Well In Poll Because He Is Going To Win The Election

Former Houston Mayor Bill White is easily within striking distance of incumbent Governor Rick Perry according a new poll.

Governor Perry leads Mr. White by just 42% to 41%  says a poll conducted by a Republican polling firm and sponsored by Texas Watch.

Why is this race so close?

It is so close because Bill White  is going to beat Rick Perry on November 2.

Here is the White campaign web page.

Don’t take my word for why you should vote for Bill White. I’m an ideologically motivated partisan.

Go to the website yourself and see why 10 years of Rick Perry so far is enough, and see if you agree that Bill White is someone who will do a good job for Texas.

Even in Republican Texas, people seem to have had enough of Rick Perry.

September 8, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | 3 Comments

Tea Party Candidate Proposes Internment Camps For Undocumented Persons

Book Of The Day-–Samuel Slater Bobblehead is reading The Age Of Reform–From Bryan To F.D.R. by the great historian Richard Hofstadter.

It is quite industrious of Samuel Slater to read such a learned book.

The link above is to a Hofstadter reading list and reviews of some of his famous titles. An education in American history would be greatly assisted by reading Richard Hofstadter….And by learning about Samuel Slater!

Link Of The Day A Tea Party backed Republican running for the Florida House of Representatives has proposed internment camps for undocumented immigrants. The candidate’s name is Marg Baker.

Nothing in our society is so bad that it cannot be proposed and cannot come true.

Texas Link Of The Day-The Dallas Morning News offered up an article about the use of social media by the candidates for Governor in Texas. This article features an insightful quote from my fellow Texas blogger Matt Glazer of the Burnt Orange Report.

Here is the campaign web home of Bill White for Governor.

Blogger’s Note—Because I have some other projects I want to take on, I’ll be offering up shorter and more formulaic posts for the remainder of August. These posts will still be quite good and will merit your visiting the blog each day. Yet at the same time, shorter posts will allow me the time to accomplish other objectives. Thanks for reading Texas Liberal.

August 16, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Bill White For Governor Training Session In Webster On 8/14—Attendance Is Mandatory

There is a training session coming up in the Houston area to help with the Bill White for Governor campaign.

Consistent with Democratic Party plans to turn America into a socialist  police state, attendance at this training session is mandatory for residents of the Houston area.

I know some of you have plans for the weekend, but you’ll just have to put them off.

Houston blogger John Coby of Bay Area Houston will be at this event.  Tell him  Texas Liberal sent you.

Here is the link for the Bill White for Governor campaign.

This session will be held in Webster. The details are below.

Learn how to reach out to prospective voters through proven techniques at a training session for volunteers interested in working on the Bill White for Governor campaign. Advance registration is strongly recommended but not required.  RSVP to Suzy Allison at suzy.allison@att.net

When: Saturday, August 14th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: City of Webster Recreation Center building, 101 Pennsylvania (at the corner of Pennsylvania & S. Austin streets),77598.
Cost: Free
Food: Light refreshments will be provided during the break.Sponsors: BAADWomen (Bay Area Association of Democratic Women) and BAND (Bay Area New Democrats)

If you haven’t been able to attend an all-day Bill White University training session at the Bill White headquarters in Houston,  you will benefit from this Bill White Community College, a shorter (3 hours), local (Webster) Bill White volunteer training program. Program segments includes the following:

  • Block walking training.
  • Virtual phone bank familiarization.
  • Phone bank training.
  • Strategy overview for the Bill White effort.
  • Issues, talking points, and charges and rebuttals.
  • Plans for Bay Area headquarters.
  • Information on all nearby headquarters will be provided.

We’d like some clue as to how many will attend, so RSVP to Suzy Allison at suzy.allison@att.net, but feel free to come if you didn’t get around to replying – we’re pretty flexible.

August 11, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Can Bill White Beat Rick Perry?—Four Reasons Bill White Will Win in November

Can Bill White defeat Governor Rick Perry to become the next Governor of Texas?

Yes.

Here are four reasons why—

1. The latest poll shows that Mr. White, the Democratic nominee, and Mr. Perry are tied at 43% each here in Republican Texas. Mr. White is doing more than hoping to play catch-up. He is running even.

2. Many Republicans intend to vote for Mr. White. Governor Perry is having a difficult time holding his base.

From the Houston Chronicle—

“Wales Madden Jr., an Amarillo attorney and civic leader, cast his first Republican vote in 1948, for almost-President Thomas E. Dewey. Although he admits to voting for Democrats in the 1950s and 1960s, when Texas Republicans were a rare breed, he has voted almost exclusively GOP since Democrat-turned-Republican John Connally asked him to be the statewide party chairman for his presidential bid in 1976. When his candidate for governor, U.S. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, fell to Gov. Rick Perry, he switched his support to Democrat Bill White.”

3. In an anti-incumbent election season, Rick Perry is the longest serving Governor in the history of Texas.

4. Governor Perry’s extreme right-wing positions, such as talking abut Texas leaving the union and refusing federal funds to help improve Texas education, are alienating potential Perry supporters.

These are just some of the reasons that former Houston Mayor White can and will win in November.

Here is the Bill White campaign web home.

June 24, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | 6 Comments

Examples Of Cross-Party Voting in Texas—Voting Across Party Lines Most Often Does Not Make Sense

Here are two pictures I’ve taken in Houston in recent weeks of some likely cross-party voting this November.

The first picture shows an intent to vote for Democrat Bill White for Governor and Republican incumbent David Dewhurst for Lt. Governor.

The best course would be to vote for Mr. White for Governor and Democratic nominee Linda Chavez-Thompson for Lt. Gov. Ms. Chavez-Thompson has a proven record of advocacy for working people in Texas.

Why would you support for Governor and Lt. governor two people of opposing political ideologies?

The second picture shows support for Houston Mayor Annise Parker, a Democrat who will next be on the ballot in 2011, and Republican Harris County Judge Ed Emmett. Judge Emmett is on the ballot for 2010.

Mr. Emmett is known as a County Judge here in Texas. Outside Texas and much of the south you might call him a County Commissioner.

Gordon Quan is the Democrat running against Mr. Emmett in 2010.

Mr. Emmett’s web home calls him a”conservative pioneer.” Why would you support a person who identifies himself in this way while at the same time supporting a Democrat for Mayor?

In practice, Mayor Parker and Judge Emmett represent in Houston and Harris County an often centrist, business centered outlook that does appeal to some. (Though not me.)  In fairness to Judge Emmett, he is not a nut.  Yet at the same time, neither is he the right person to address the hard economic circumstances faced by so many in Harris County.

As for Mayor Parker, my view is that she willfully ignores issues of extreme poverty in Houston. She also ignores the need for greater Hispanic involvement in our political process in Houston.

Ms. Parker’s voter base is narrow and largely Anglo. She won in 2009 in a election that generated turnout of barely over 15%. While some of Ms. Parker’s supporters see themselves as progressives, economic issues are often not the chief concern of these voters.

There are many people in Houston who could use Mayor Parker’s bully pulpit and advocacy. This support has not so far been forthcoming.

When will liberals, progressives and Democrats ask more of Mayor Parker?

On a larger level, political parties provide a shorthand and a coherence that is useful to the wise voter and to the informed citizen. Politics is at core about beliefs and action rather than about personalities and playing it safe when people need help.

While there will be exceptions, the more practical and intellectually coherent approach to voting is to support a group of candidates who will work towards the same ends.

June 15, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

My Bumper Stickers Are Driving Bill White’s Surge In The Polls—White Just Four Points Behind

The latest poll has Democratic nominee for Governor Bill White within four percentage points of incumbent Republican Governor Rick Perry.

Why is former Houston Mayor White doing so well in the polls in Republican Texas?

I feel the reason is the combination of bumper stickers that are on the back of my car. The picture above is of the back of my car.

My call for universal brotherhood and sisterhood is sweeping Texas. Caught up in the good feelings I am engendering is Mr. White.

People see my bumper stickers and they do feel that they love all people in all nations and that we need a new Governor who cares about the needs of average Texans instead of just Tea party extremists.

People in texas are at their best when they agree with my positions.

Please visit the Bill White for Governor web home and see what Mr. White is saying to the people of Texas.

April 20, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , | 2 Comments

Green Party Ballot Access Drive For Texas In 2010—Texas Progressive Alliance Round-Up

At the end of this post is the weekly round-up of the Texas Progressive Alliance. The TPA is a confederation of the best political bloggers in Texas. (Each week I run the TPA round-up and include  facts about Texas politics or Texas history. Running the round-up this week with information about the Green Party in no way implies that my TPA fellow bloggers support or do not support Green Party ballot access or any Green Party candidates in Texas for 2010.)

With the round-up this week is information about efforts by the Green Party of Texas to get ballot access in Texas for the 2010 election. If successful, these efforts may lead to automatic ballot access for Texas Greens in 2012.

Greens are running a candidate for State Comptroller named Ed Lindsay. There is no Democrat in this race. If Mr. Lindsay can get on the ballot and then win 5% on Election Day, the Green Party would qualify for automatic Texas statewide ballot access in 2012. With no Democrat on the ballot, the 5% goal is very possible.

There are Greens running for other positions for the Texas Statewide ballot and in other races in Texas. A petition effort is underway to help get these folks on the ballot. This petition effort is detailed at the link to the Green Party of Texas.

The statewide races in Texas are important in 2010. Bill White for Governor and Linda Chavez-Thompson for Lieutenant Governor are the Democratic nominees who I strongly support. Given the difference between these two candidates and their Republican opponents, it is essential that they be elected for the economic and educational well-being of all Texans. Another big issue is how Texas will implement federal health care reforms. Will Texans get access to health insurance and have a chance to get well when they get sick, or will our state government fight health care reform all the way and allow people to die from lack of care in order to satisfy the Republican political base?

These things said, Texans deserve options at the ballot box. In addition to giving Texans a true choice in the race for State Comptroller, Greens are offering a candidate , Paul Cardwell, for the District 9 State Board of Education race where there is also no Democrat on the ballot.

Libertarians are on the ballot all over Texas. Libertarian ballot access gives Republicans an option when they do not like their own nominees, and it gives voice to constituencies in Texas that may not always find something to support with the two major parties. While Libertarians are a dismal selfish lot, they have the right to ballot access and to try to convince voters to accept their barbaric law-of-the-jungle views.

Greens should have the chance to advocate for economic, social, and environmental justice and fair play. Here are the ten core values of the Green Party.

The Green petition can be signed by any person who did not vote in either the Democratic or Republican primaries last month. I voted in the Democratic primary and am not eligible to sign the Green petition. You must also be a registered voter to sign the petition. Here is a list of county Green Party contacts in Texas if you want to volunteer to circulate the petition.

The Greens are making the petition available online for you to print up and circulate. You can print it and have family members and friends sign. Here is an explanation of this process. Even the smallest number of signatures makes a difference.

Please consider the helping the Green Party get on the ballot in Texas in 2010. Green party ballot access will strengthen democracy in Texas by giving voters more options.

Here is the weekly TPA round-up—

At Texas Voxour thoughts remain with the victims of the West Virginia mining disaster, the worst mining accident in 25 years.

CouldBeTrue of South Texas Chisme wants to know why Republicans like Victoria’s DA Steve TylerNueces County’s DA Anna Jimenez and (who could forget) Alberto Gonzales abuse their offices?

The Texas Cloverleaf thinks Rick Perry is eyeing 2012 before 2010 is even over with. Continue reading

April 18, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | 3 Comments