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To The Extent You Are Able, Avoid Drifting—Seaweed, Driftwood & A Sea Tumbleweed

Above is a picture I took last year in Galveston, Texas  You see that seagull is eating some creature unlucky enough to be caught in a clump of seaweed and washed up on the beach.

This is what happens if you drift through life. You get washed up on the beach and maybe eaten.

Here is a definition of seaweed-

Any of various red, green, or brown algae that live in ocean waters. Some species of seaweed are free-floating, while others are attached to the ocean bottom. Seaweed range from the size of a pinhead to having large fronds (such as those of many kelps) that can be as much as 30.5 m (100 ft) in length. Certain species are used for food (such as nori) and fertilizer, and others are harvested for carrageenan and other substances used as thickening, stabilizing, emulsifying, or suspending agents in industrial, pharmaceutical, and food products. Seaweed is also a natural source of the element iodine, which is otherwise found only in very small amounts.

Here is a link to the well-done Seaweed Site. It will teach you a lot about seaweed.

Here is information from NOAA about deep water seaweed in the Gulf of Mexico.

Below is a picture I took last year of some driftwood that got stuck on shore on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River across from Cincinnati.

I don’t want to be driftwood. That log is marooned.

At the end of this post is a photo I took few years ago of seaweed and what is, as far as I can tell, a sea tumbleweed.

A tumbleweed just blows around.

This picture was taken on the Gulf of Mexico side of North Padre Island National Seashore just outside of Corpus Christi.

Circumstance plays a great part in life. Sometimes you are just out of luck. But to the extent possible, try to take command of your fate. Be more than seaweed, driftwood, or a tumbleweed.

Here is the definition of a tumbleweed—-

“Any of various densely branched annual plants, such as amaranth and Russian thistle, that break off from the roots at the end of the growing season and are rolled about by the wind. 

All photos in this post copyright Neil Aquino

April 30, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Do More Than Just Drift

The Galveston County Daily News reports that there is an unusual amount of seaweed washing up on Galveston beaches.

Above is a picture I took last week in Galveston. You see that seagull is eating some creature unlucky enough to be caught in a clump of seaweed and washed up on the beach.

This is what happens if you drift through life. You get washed up on the beach and maybe eaten.

Here is a definition of seaweed-

Any of various red, green, or brown algae that live in ocean waters. Some species of seaweed are free-floating, while others are attached to the ocean bottom. Seaweed range from the size of a pinhead to having large fronds (such as those of many kelps) that can be as much as 30.5 m (100 ft) in length. Certain species are used for food (such as nori) and fertilizer, and others are harvested for carrageenan and other substances used as thickening, stabilizing, emulsifying, or suspending agents in industrial, pharmaceutical, and food products. Seaweed is also a natural source of the element iodine, which is otherwise found only in very small amounts.

Here is a link to the well-done Seaweed Site. It will teach you a lot about seaweed.

Here is information from NOAA about deep water seaweed in the Gulf of Mexico.

Below is a picture I took last year of some driftwood that got stuck on shore on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River across from Cincinnati.

I don’t want to be driftwood. That log is marooned.

Below is a photo I took few years ago of seaweed and what is, as far as I can see, a sea-tumbleweed.

A tumbleweed just blows around.

This picture was taken on the Gulf of Mexico side of North Padre Island National Seashore just outside of Corpus Christi.

Circumstance plays a great part in life. Sometimes you are just out of luck. But to the extent possible, you’ve got to take command of your fate. Be more than seaweed, driftwood, or a tumbleweed.

Here is the definition of a tumbleweed—-

“Any of various densely branched annual plants, such as amaranth and Russian thistle, that break off from the roots at the end of the growing season and are rolled about by the wind. 


May 17, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Photo Of Seaweed and Sea-Tumbleweed

Above is a photo I took of seaweed and what is, as far as I’m concerned, a sea-tumbleweed.

This picture was taken on the Gulf of Mexico side of North Padre Island National Seashore just outside of Corpus Christi.

Here is a definition of seaweed-

Any of various red, green, or brown algae that live in ocean waters. Some species of seaweed are free-floating, while others are attached to the ocean bottom. Seaweed range from the size of a pinhead to having large fronds (such as those of many kelps) that can be as much as 30.5 m (100 ft) in length. Certain species are used for food (such as nori) and fertilizer, and others are harvested for carrageenan and other substances used as thickening, stabilizing, emulsifying, or suspending agents in industrial, pharmaceutical, and food products. Seaweed is also a natural source of the element iodine, which is otherwise found only in very small amounts.

Here is a link to the well-done Seaweed Site. It will teach you a lot about seaweed.

Here is information from NOAA about deep water seaweed in the Gulf of Mexico.

The first tumbleweed I ever saw was covered with snow at a truck stop in Sidney, Nebraska. Though since it was covered with snow it was not tumbling very much.

Here is a link to a tumbleweed farm in Kansas that will ship tumbleweeds around the world.

Here is the definition of a tumbleweed—-

Any of various densely branched annual plants, such as amaranth and Russian thistle, that break off from the roots at the end of the growing season and are rolled about by the wind.  

March 30, 2008 Posted by | Sea Life, Texas | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Basic Questions Of Democracy From Sand Dunes Of North Padre Island

 

I recently read an article in the North Padre Island Moon about a new political action committee called Island United. North Padre Island is part of Corpus Christi, Texas.  

A purpose of this PAC is to encourage island residents to vote as a block in order to influence the outcome of elections for the Corpus Christi City Council and Mayor of Corpus Christi.

(Above is a Padre Island sand dune though I’m not sure how you’d prove otherwise if I’m making its location up. Here is information on sand dunes.)  

Some N. Padre Island residents feel a divided vote from the Island weakens the clout of the community at Corpus Christi City Hall.   

Here is the full article.

Please click here for a political map of Corpus Christi. 

The presumption of this PAC is that highly localized issues should be the guiding factor in how residents of this area cast votes for city council and mayor.  

Given the existing reality that Island voters have a history of differing opinions on who should be elected to municipal posts in Corpus Christi, this seems to be a tenuous assertion.    

What are factors beyond North Padre Island issues that could impact how people there vote for council and mayor?

1. How will candidates for city office administer Corpus Christi as a whole? Just as no man is an island, we can also say that not even an island is an island.

2. While I’m going to guess these council elections are officially non-partisan, voters likely have some sense of the state and national party affiliations of the candidates. Party matters at all levels of politics.

3. Voters may have competing loyalties. Endorsements from local unions or police groups or gay groups may count as much or more to some than where exactly in the city they live.          

4. The race, ethnicity, religious preferences, or gender of candidates may be a positive or a negative to some voters.

5. Especially in the one district-level council seat described in the article, some voters may know the candidates. They may like or dislike the candidates on a purely personal level.

6.  Even on issues meaningful only to North Padre Island, voters there are likely to have differing views.   

I think the basic assumptions of the Island United PAC are flawed.

First, they are asking voters to put narrow interests in front of city-wide concerns. That might make sense for a district seat, but not for city-wide at-large seats and for the mayor’s office.

Also, Island United is asking voters to file away long-standing party choices, various competing loyalties beyond a street address, and the aspects of human nature that influence how people vote.  

In suggesting voters put aside all these factors for highly local concerns, Island United is at one time asking too little and too much of the people of the North Padre Island area of Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, U.S.A.

March 19, 2008 Posted by | Politics, Texas | , , , , , , | Leave a comment