Texas Liberal

All People Matter

Everyday Life Is Where Self-Respect And Respect For Others Begins—Shovels At The Met And On Houston’s Streets

Above is a photo of a 19th-century shovel that can be found in gallery 774 of the American Wing of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

There are a number of shovels of various kinds in the collection of this museum.

There is a lot to be said for the fact that a common tool of a working person is on display in a world-famous museum.

Everyday life has great value.

Everyday life, everyday relationships, and everyday work are a center of the power and the value of our lives.

Respect for our everyday lives is the gateway to respect and concern for the lives of others.

Respect for ourselves and respect for others are two sides of the same coin.

Our political leaders–especially though not  exclusively those on the right–play on our lack of self-respect and on our anger at others.

We all have far more in common than we often wish to admit that we do.

We have far less invested in how this corrupt society is run than we often admit to ourselves.

(Blogger’s note 6/22/12—This is a post I ran a few weeks ago. I liked it so much I am running it again. I was spurred to run it again by the picture I took see below of some shovels that were being used for a construction project in Houston. This picture is a new addition ot this post. Maybe these shovels will someday also end up in a museum. All around us and every day we see the things that help us explain our world and help us see the value of everyday working people and of everyday life.) 

June 22, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , | 2 Comments

An Everyday Shovel On Display At The New York Metropolitan Museum Of Art—Everyday Life Has Great Value

Above is a photo of a 19th-century shovel that can be found in gallery 774 of the American Wing of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

There are a number of shovels of various kinds in the collection of this museum.

There is a great deal to be said for the fact that a common tool of a working person is on display in a world-famous museum.

Everyday life has great value.

Everyday life, everyday relationships, and everyday work are a center of the power and the value of our lives.

Respect for our everyday lives is the gateway to respect and concern for the lives that others lead.

Respect for ourselves and respect for others are two sides of the same coin.

May 24, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Two Great Web Resources Of American History And Culture—Everybody Has The Ability To Learn And To Act

While much of what is on the web is junk, there are some great resources for folks who want to use their discretionary time effectively.

C-SPAN has a full archive of all its programming over the years.

One thing I find of value at the C-SPAN site is the Booknotes page. Booknotes was a weekly interview program that ran each week for a number of years.

The most recent interview I listened to was one from 1989 with Colonel David Hackworth. Colonel Hackworth was a decorated solider from Korea and Vietnam who came to oppose war and much about how the Army operated. This is programming you can listen to on your home computer while you are getting other stuff done.

Here is a Colonel Hackworth’s obituary from 2005. 

An interview on Booknotes I found of interest was one from 1998 of Iris Chang who wrote The Rape of Nanking–The Forgotten Holocaust of World War II. This book is about the Japanese occupation of China. Here is an obituary of Iris Chang 

If you look on the top left on this link, you’ll find access to a full list of old C-SPAN series and programs about a great number of topics. There is a great deal of interest here on a wide variety of topics relating to American history and American authors.

Another great resource is the website of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

While there is a great deal of interest at this site, it is the new American wing that most holds my attention.

Here is a New York Times tour of some of the exhibits in the American wing.

You can look at and read a bit about every piece of art in each gallery of the American wing. You can do this for the art in the other galleries of the museum as well.

This works on a mobile device as well if you look it up that way.

Each work also has a link to its place the very good Heillbrunn Timeline of Art History.

This art is an insight to the political, cultural and personal lives of Americans.

If these resources don’t sail your ship, find something that does.

Everybody has the capacity to understand complex things. The resources are out there to learn all sorts of stuff.

Empowered with what we learn, we all have the ability to put forth our views and to act. Progress is up to each of us.

(Below–Enoch Wood Perry‘s Talking It Over from 1872.)

January 27, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment