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2012 Memorial Day Service At Houston VA National Cemetery

This post has two pictures I took a few days ago at the Houston VA National Cemetery. It seemed the right thing to do to visit this place over Memorial Day Weekend.

Here is what my father—who died last year—wrote based on his combat experience in the Korean War—

“One thing that I learned is that the young men who fought in our wars should never be forgotten…Another fact I learned…is that millions may serve but far fewer fight. So, in reality, for many who have served, war is a glory-and-gory myth that feeds on its own legends and publicity. …Another truth I learned is that civilians are combatants in war–embattled victims perpetually on a losing side….That brings us to the biggest deception: The need to be ready defend our freedom if we are to keep it. Those who say that freedom has a price are absolutely right, and wrong: International conflict today is beyond ideology. The only freedom American and Russian leaders offer their  people today is the freedom to kill ourselves in the name of freedom.  This is not freedom, but allegiance to a suicidal death culture….Today, we are servile to our masters, mistaking economic well-being for true freedom, which is the freedom to live hopefully and not to die needlessly.” 

There will be a Memorial Day service at the Houston VA Cemetery. At the bottom of this post are the details.

The best way we can mark Memorial Day is to recall and thank those who served, thank those who have worked over the years for peace, and work each day ourselves for a society in which we never again go to war based on a lie as we did in Iraq.

Here are the details about the Memorial Day observance in Houston—

A special Memorial Day Service will be held on Monday, May 28, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. at the Houston VA National Cemetery, located at 10410 Veterans Memorial Drive.

This year, the Department of Veterans Affairs is pleased to announce that retired Navy Reserve Captain Richard L. Halferty will give the Memorial Day address. Halferty serves as the Chief Operating Officer for H.M.S. Telecom LLC., and has extensive experience in logistics, contingency and emergency planning.  Halferty served in the United States Navy Reserve for over 38 years retiring as a Captain in 1986.  He currently serves as Chairman, Korean War Veterans, Lone Star Chapter.  Among his military awards are the Navy Commendation Medal, China Service Medal, National Defense Medal, Armed Forces Reserve and the United Nations Medal.  Continue reading

May 28, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | 2 Comments

Tip At Time-And-A-Half On Memorial Day—Self-Respect And Respect For Fellow Working People Are The Same Thing

Memorial Day weekend is coming up.

There will be a lot of people out and about over the holiday weekend.

Though, of course, the purpose of the holiday is to recall our soldiers who have died in our wars.

While out and about enjoying your holiday weekend, please be mindful of the people who are working over the weekend and on Memorial Day.

Treat them well and tip them well.

Memorial Day is a federal holiday.

Tip people the same time and-a-half-rate that you would expect to be paid for working a holiday.

If you normally tip at 15%, tip at 22.5 % on the holiday. If you normally tip at 20%, tip at 30% on the holiday.

If you are not paid a fair wage on a holiday, that is not the fault of the person helping you on Memorial Day.

Self-respect and respect for fellow working people are the exact same thing.

Sometimes I go to the convenience store up the street on holidays.

When I do, I buy the folks working a $1 lottery ticket to thank them for working the holiday.

We’ve got to look out for each other and treat each other well.

It is up to each of us to look out for each other and treat each other well.

May 25, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Houston Area 2012 Memorial Day Events

Memorial Day 2012 is Monday, May 28.

Here is my annual posting of Memorial Day facts and links.

As always, there will be a number of events observing Memorial Day in the Greater Houston area.

The leading event in our area each year is at the Houston VA Cemetery. At the bottom of this post are details of the 2012 events from the website of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Fort Bend County will be observing Memorial Day in Fulshear.

The George Ranch in Richmond, Fort Bend County will be having a Memorial Day observance on Saturday, May 26 that will take a historic look at how America’s wars have impacted Texans.

The Galveston County Daily News regularly updates a list of Memorial Day events in Galveston County. Here is the  most recent listing.

Here is a link to Memorial Day weekend events in The Woodlands.  These planned events in The Woodlands seem a bit more festive than reflective.

The Woodlands Memorial Day weekend events involve “Fireworks. Live Music. Vendors. Street Performers. And more….”

I guess we would not want to think about death or anything that would detract from shopping.

My late father was a combat veteran of the Korean War. Here is a small portion of what he wrote a number of years ago about war—

“One thing that I learned is that the young men who fought in our wars should never be forgotten…Another fact I learned…is that millions may serve but far fewer fight. So, in reality, for many who have served, war is a glory-and-gory myth that feeds on its own legends and publicity. …Another truth I learned is that civilians are combatants in war–embattled victims perpetually on a losing side….That brings us to the biggest deception: The need to be ready defend our freedom if we are to keep it. Those who say that freedom has a price are absolutely right, and wrong: International conflict today is beyond ideology. The only freedom American and Russian leaders offer their  people today is the freedom to kill ourselves in the name of freedom.  This is not freedom, but allegiance to a suicidal death culture….Today, we are servile to our masters, mistaking economic well-being for true freedom, which is the freedom to live hopefully and not to die needlessly.” 

We can honor those who have died in our wars without buying into our violent culture that often values war over peace, and without forgetting that we sent our soldiers to a war in Iraq that was based on lies.

If there are events in the Houston area I am missing, please leave a comment and I will add that event to this list.

Here is the Houston VA observance—

A special Memorial Day Service will be held on Monday, May 28, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. at the Houston VA National Cemetery, located at 10410 Veterans Memorial Drive.

This year, the Department of Veterans Affairs is pleased to announce that retired Navy Reserve Captain Richard L. Halferty will give the Memorial Day address. Halferty serves as the Chief Operating Officer for H.M.S. Telecom LLC., and has extensive experience in logistics, contingency and emergency planning.  Halferty served in the United States Navy Reserve for over 38 years retiring as a Captain in 1986.  He currently serves as Chairman, Korean War Veterans, Lone Star Chapter.  Among his military awards are the Navy Commendation Medal, China Service Medal, National Defense Medal, Armed Forces Reserve and the United Nations Medal.  Continue reading

May 21, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Memorial Day 2012 Is May 28—Memorial Day Facts & Links

In 2012, Memorial Day is Monday, May 28.

(Here are some Houston area 2012 Memorial Day events.)

This post has some history on the origins of Memorial Day and, also, links appropriate for Memorial Day

( We’ve been fighting wars for a long time. Above is an engraving by Amos Doolittle of  the Battle of Lexington and Concord in 1775.)

Here is a brief explanation of the origins of Memorial Day—

Memorial Day originated in 1868, when Union General John A. Logan designated a day in which the graves of Civil War soldiers would be decorated. Known as Decoration Day, the holiday was changed to Memorial Day within twenty years, becoming a holiday dedicated to the memory of all war dead. It became a federal holiday in 1971, and is now observed on the last Monday in May.

Here is a much more detailed explanation.

Here are pictures of each of the dead along with their ages and hometowns for U.S. Soliders who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan.  We often talk about how much we care for these troops, yet we really have just gone on about our business as they have fought and been  hurt and killed.

(This representation of a disagreement between Tecumseh and William Henry Harrison is a reminder that sometimes U.S. troops were called upon to do harm to the native population. Tecumseh died in the War of 1812.)

Here is a list of minor and major wars in American history.

Here are numbers of American dead and wounded in our wars.

Here is the article that broke the story of mistreatment of veterans at Walter Reed Hospital. Another case of how the care we say we have for our veterans does not match up to the reality.

Here is the Veterans of Foreign Wars home page.

Here is Iraq Body Count. This organization counts the number of Iraqis killed in the Iraq War. All people have equal value.

( Below—A strong peace movement serves any nation well.)

Here is the activist group Peace Action. This group has been around since 1957.

Here is a list of Medal of Honor winners for great bravery in American wars.

Here is information on women in American wars.

Here is the National Association of Black Veterans.

(Henry Hulbert, below, was a winner of the Medal of Honor in WW I.)

Here is information on the Revolutionary War.

Here is information on the War of 1812.

Here is information about the Civil War.

Here is information on World War I.

Here is information on World War II.

Here is information about the Korean War.

Here is information on the Vietnam War.

Here is information about the War in Iraq.

Here in an article from Salon about possible American war crimes in Afghanistan and Iraq.

War crimes take place in all wars and are committed by all sides. It is not a contradiction to acknowledge this fact and still respect the great majority who served honorably. At the same time, it is disrespectful to the concepts of democracy and human rights to ignore these facts.

The National World War II Memorial in Washington is excellent to visit…..

As is the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington.….

And the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

I once  called my father— who fought in the Korean War—from the Korean War Memorial and asked him about the historical accuracy of how the troops were sculpted. He said based on my descriptions, it was an accurate portrayal. ( Photo below of Korean War Memorial in Washington.)

I’ve been able to visit Punchbowl Cemetery in Honolulu. Many of our dead from wars in the Pacific are buried here. This is one of the most important and impressive locations you can visit in Honolulu.

I’ve also visited Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in San Diego.

I once toured the Normandy American Cemetery and Monument near Omaha Beach in France.

Below is Arlington National Cemetery. I was fortunate to once visit Arlington on Memorial Day weekend and see the American flags at each gravestone.

Both those who fight our wars, and those who work hard to make sure that we do not need to go to war, are of essential value to our nation.

May 19, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | | Leave a comment

Memorial Day

Here is the dog tag of Korean War combat veteran and medic Tony Aquino. Tony never said anything macho or boastful about his service. He would tell you if you asked.

He was a liberal who opposed the Vietnam War and both Iraq wars. He resented people like B. Clinton, Quayle, G.W. Bush & Cheney who used connections to get out of serving, and then sent other people to war.

Just like you and I, and just like our nation taken as a whole, Tony was both flawed and decent.

Tony was alive last Memorial Day. Now he is dead.

May 30, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | | 2 Comments

Houston Police Officer Kevin Will Killed While Serving City Over Memorial Day Weekend

A Houston police officer was killed while serving the city over Memorial Day weekend.

(Update 6/2/11–The circumstances of Officer Will’s death leaves people with a choice about how to respond.)   

(Update–Here is the latest on this story from the Houston Chronicle from 6/1 at 11:00 PM.

From the Houston Chronicle

“A Houston police officer was struck and killed by a suspected drunken driver early Sunday while investigating an accident on the North Loop near Yale. The 38-year-old officer, Kevin Will, died at the scene, Houston Police Chief Charles McClelland said. Will was a father of two children, ages 6 and 10, and his wife is 6 months pregnant with their third child, the chief said. The driver, 26-year-old Johoan Rodriguez, was taken to an area hospital for toxicology tests, police said. He’s currently in jail, facing pending charges of intoxication manslaughter of a peace officer, felony evading and possession of a controlled substance…  “At this morning’s roll call, (Will) announced to his comrades that today was his one-year anniversary in Vehicular Crimes, and he made a joke that he’s been here a year, so does that qualify him to be a veteran or is he still a rookie?” McClellan said. ..”

Above is a picture of Officer Will.

Everybody who drives in Houston knows that our roads are filled with drunks, crazies, and people taking all sorts of unnecessary risks.

While even at the most difficult times we can acknowledge that criminal acts can be in part the result of economic and social conditions, we must recall the fact we all have a choice to make about how we will conduct ourselves on our roads.

The decision to drive in a way harmful to others is made by each individual who gets behind the wheel.

I’m sorry about the loss of Officer Will.

May 29, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Ways Of Observing Memorial Day

With Memorial Day weekend almost here, please allow me to suggest some possible ways to observe the holiday—

1. Drive safely-— Make sure you have a designated driver if you will be out drinking. Be safe on the roads. As a general matter–Please slow down and be careful on all the highways of life.

Often it seems we take a day that is meant to honor service and sacrifice, and we turn it into a time for us to conduct ourselves like idiots.

2. Tip well all weekend and on the holiday—Please recall that Monday is a holiday and that you might well expect time-and-a-half for working a holiday. Please consider this fact if you are out and about for the weekend ahead and for Monday.

Respect for our fellow working people is a measure of our own self-respect. Almost all of us have to work for a living. Let us use the freedom we have to honor the value of our everyday lives.

3. Give some thought for the real purpose of Memorial Day—The purpose of the day is honor soldiers who have died in our wars. Take the time to fly the flag in front of your home, to attend a Memorial Day observance, to call or visit a veteran you may know, to donate to veterans related group or charity, to read a book that would increase your understanding of the sacrifices made by our service men and women, or to observe the holiday in any manner that you feel would be helpful and respectful.

And, of course, American freedom has been served by soldiers from other nations all the way back to the Revolutionary War. Our thoughts need not be limited to our own nation. People all over the world care about freedom and have fought for freedom.

Many people have over the years also have taken great risks and made personal sacrifices for the cause of peace. This should not be forgotten. There are many different types of courage.

Here is a link to my post about Memorial Day events in Houston/Galveston area.

Here is my post on the history of Memorial Day.  

May 26, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Houston-Galveston 2011 Memorial Day Events—Memorial Day History And Links

(Blogger’s Note–5/21/12—Here are Houston area events for Memorial Day 2012.)

Memorial Day, 2011 is May 30.

Freedom-loving citizens in the Houston and Galveston area will attending Memorial Day events in the days ahead.

For all of you good folks who wrongly feel that liberals do not care about our troops, please recall that you are getting this information at a blog called Texas Liberal.

A big Memorial Day event in Houston each year is the ceremony at the Houston National Cemetery.

(Above–Houston National Cemetery. Picture by Postoak.)

Here are some details on the 2011 event—

“This year, the Department of Veterans Affairs is pleased to announce that retired Air Force Colonel Ann M. Testa, current federal security director, George Bush Intercontinental Airport, will give the Memorial Day address at Houston National Cemetery… Testa served in the United States Air Force for over 27 years retiring as a Colonel in 2001.  In addition to earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from MIT, she received a Master of Science degree in Human Resources Management from the State University of New York. In addition to Testa’s remarks, the event will feature a parade of colors and wreaths by numerous local veterans’ organizations, ROTC units, and Boy and Girl Scout troops. All Boy and Girl Scout organizations in southeast Texas are invited to attend. There will also be many symbolic highlights including a flyover by the U.S. Coast Guard; a performance of Taps; a cannon salute; a riderless horse procession by the Houston Police Mounted Patrol; Amazing Grace performed by Ian Martin; and a rifle salute by the VFW District #4 Ceremonial Detail accompanied by Co. A 13th U.S. Regular Infantry with muskets. Peggy Slay, president of the Houston Gold Star Mothers will lead the pledge of allegiance…”

Here are some details about parking at this event—

Park FREE at the North Shepherd Park & Ride, 7821 North Shepherd at Veterans Memorial Drive, Houston 77088, for a convenient connection to the 108 Veterans Memorial METRO bus.  The route will run from 7 a.m. – 1 p.m. (fares apply) on a 20 minute frequency.  Additional transportation will be provided at the gate of the cemetery to the event for elderly and disabled.

Here is the web page of the Houston National Cemetery.

Houston Veterans for Peace will be planting U.S. and Texas flags in honor of Texans who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan at Discovery Green Park in Downtown Houston. Civilian deaths will also be noted in this observance. This event will run from Saturday 5/28 through Memorial Day.

While I wish it were otherwise, there is no Memorial Day Parade in Houston.

Here are some specfics about a Memorial Day event at Seawolf Park in Galveston–

“The Memorial Day Service held at Seawolf Park is the 10th annual such service and begins at 11 am on Monday.  The service is open to the public and we invite all to come and be part of this remembrance….  This service features a speaker from each branch of the service who remembers their lost.  We also conduct a tolling of the Boats for all the submariners lost in WWII who have no graves.  If their operational activities permit, a USCG helicopter will hover over the harbor outside of Seawolf Park and place a wreath in the water for those lost at sea who have no grave. The submarine USS Cavalla at Seawolf park is a WWII veteran and responsible for sinking the Japanese carrier Shokaku which had attacked Pearl Harbor. “

The Galveston County Daily News has a list of other Memorial Day events for Sunday and Memorial Day in Galveston County.

If you are aware of any other events in the Houston-Galveston area, please post a comment.

Below is a history of Memorial Day and a number of links about subjects related to Memorial Day—- Continue reading

May 25, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , | 2 Comments

Memorial Day, 2011 Is May 30—Memorial Day History And Links

In 2011, Memorial Day is Monday, May 30

Here is some history on the origins of Memorial Day and, also, links appropriate for Memorial Day

Take the time it requires to learn about the world.

( We’ve been fighting wars for a long time. Above is an engraving by Amos Doolittle of  the Battle of Lexington and Concord in 1775.)

Here is a brief explanation of the origins of Memorial Day—

Memorial Day originated in 1868, when Union General John A. Logan designated a day in which the graves of Civil War soldiers would be decorated. Known as Decoration Day, the holiday was changed to Memorial Day within twenty years, becoming a holiday dedicated to the memory of all war dead. It became a federal holiday in 1971, and is now observed on the last Monday in May.

Here is a much more detailed explanation.

(This representation of a disagreement between Tecumseh and William Henry Harrison is a reminder that sometimes U.S. troops were called upon to do harm to the native population. Tecumseh died in the War of 1812.)

Here is a list of minor and major wars in American history.

Here are numbers of American dead and wounded in our wars.

Here is the article that broke the story of mistreatment of veterans at Walter Reed Hospital. We say we care about our veterans, but that does not always appear to be the case.

Here is the Veterans of Foreign Wars home page.

Here is Iraq Body Count. This organization counts the number of Iraqis killed in the Iraq War. All people have equal value.

( Both a strong military and a strong resistance against going to war are important aspects of democracy. )

Here is the activist group Peace Action.

Here is a list of Medal of Honor winners for great bravery in American wars.

Here is information on women in American wars.

Here is the National Association of Black Veterans.

(Henry Hulbert, below, was a winner of the Medal of Honor in WW I.)

Here is information on the Revolutionary War.

Here is information on the War of 1812.

Here is information about the Civil War. (Photo below is of dead Union soldier.)

Here is information on World War I.

Here is information on World War II.

Here is information about the Korean War.

Here is information on the Vietnam War.

Here is information about the War in Iraq.

The National World War II Memorial in Washington is excellent to visit.

As is the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington.

And the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

I called my father from the Korean War Memorial and asked him about the historical accuracy of how the troops were sculpted. He said based on my descriptions, it was an accurate portrayal. ( Photo below)

I’ve been able to visit Punchbowl Cemetery in Honolulu. Many of our dead from wars in the Pacific are buried here. This is one of the most important and impressive locations you can visit in Honolulu.

I’ve also visited Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in San Diego.

I once toured the Normandy American Cemetery and Monument near Omaha Beach in France.

Below is Arlington National Cemetery. I was fortunate to once visit Arlington on Memorial Day weekend and see the American flags at each gravestone.

Without people willing to die to protect the freedom of others, I would not be able to express my views in this blog post.  Without such people, none of us would be able to enjoy the day-to-day freedoms we often take for granted.

May 23, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | | 1 Comment

Please Have A Good Memorial Day Holiday

Please have a good Memorial Day holiday today. If you are working, I hope you are getting paid time-and-a-half.

Please take at least a little bit of time today to reflect on the reason for this holiday.

Here are some facts about Memorial Day.

May 31, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | | Leave a comment

Please Be Careful Over Memorial Day Weekend—The Roads Are Full Of Crazy Drunk People

For the Memorial Day weekend, please be safe on the roads.

Our roads and highways are full full of drunk, distracted and crazy people.

Above is a Memorial Day parade in Cripple Creek, Colorado from 1896.

I’m sure a number of those folks in the picture enjoyed a drink after the parade.

But they did not have cars to get into after they got drunk.

Though I suppose they might have shot each other.

Today we have drunk drivers and guns.

The good thing is that we also have Memorial Day to recall our soldiers.

Please make sure it is as safe a holiday as it can be given how it is we often act in this society.

Here is a post of Memorial Day history and links.

Here are two Memorial Day events in Houston.

May 28, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | | Leave a comment

Houston Memorial Day 2010—Governor Rick Perry Talked About Treason Yet Now He Is Speaking On Memorial Day

Memorial Day for 2010 in on Monday, May 31.

It is good to honor our veterans by attending a Memorial Day event.

What Memorial Day events are taking place in Houston?

(Above—Houston National Cemetery)

The Cypress Times reports the following event—

“A special Memorial Day Service will be held on Monday, May 31, 2010 at 9:30 a.m. at the Houston VA National Cemetery, located at 10410 Veterans Memorial Drive.  This year, the Department of Veterans Affairs is pleased to announce Governor Rick Perry will give the Memorial Day address.There will also be many symbolic highlights including a flyover by the U.S. Coast Guard; a performance of Taps; a cannon salute; a riderless horse procession by the Houston Police Mounted Patrol; Amazing Grace performed by the Houston Highlander Pipe Band; a white dove release; and a rifle salute by the VFW District #4 Ceremonial Detail accompanied by Co. A 13th U.S. Regular Infantry with muskets. Medal of Honor recipient David McNerney will lead the pledge of allegiance with Peggy Slay, president of the Houston Gold Star Mothers. The Memorial Day Service, honoring deceased United States servicemen and women, is free and open to the public.”

Here is the link to the full story.

Here is the link to the Houston National Cemetery.

A Memorial Day ceremony should avoid politics. It is right that the Governor of our state should come and speak about sacrifices made by our soldiers. Even though I don’t support Governor Perry , in almost every case I would not care about the political party or the political beliefs of a Memorial Day speaker. In this situation however, we need to remember that Governor Perry has talked about Texas leaving the union. No matter how you look at it, that kind of talk is a call to treason. I don’t understand how anybody could think that Rick Perry should speak on behalf of any American solider who fought for what is best about our nation.

Here is another event in the Houston area—

“Harris County Attorney Vince Ryan, a Vietnam War veteran who also served during the 1990 invasion of Panama, will be the featured speaker at the annual Precinct Three Memorial Day Ceremony in Bear Creek Pioneers Park on May 31st. This year is the 25th anniversary of the Precinct Three ceremony in which Harris County military personnel killed in war zones are honored. In advance of the ceremony, the names of those who have fallen in the previous year are etched in bronze on the Memorial Wall in the park.”

Here are more complete details about this event.

Seawolf park on Pelican Island in Galveston will be holding a Memorial Day event. The time of the event is not posted as I write this tonight. Here is the link to Seawolf Park.

In Sugar Land, there is a full-sized replica of the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Wall.

Here is a listing of the above-mentioned events and a few others—in League City, Friendswood and Fort Bend County–from the Houston Chronicle.

Here is my post about the history of Memorial Day.

May 26, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Memorial Day History & Links—Memorial Day For 2010 Is May 31

In 2010, Memorial Day is Monday, May 31.

Here is some history on the origins of Memorial Day and, also, links appropriate for Memorial Day

( We’ve been fighting wars for a long time. Above is an engraving by Amos Doolittle of  the Battle of Lexington and Concord in 1775.)

Here is a brief explanation of the origins of Memorial Day—

Memorial Day originated in 1868, when Union General John A. Logan designated a day in which the graves of Civil War soldiers would be decorated. Known as Decoration Day, the holiday was changed to Memorial Day within twenty years, becoming a holiday dedicated to the memory of all war dead. It became a federal holiday in 1971, and is now observed on the last Monday in May.

Here is a much more detailed explanation.

The American death toll in Afghanistan recently passed 1000. Here are pictures of each of the dead along with their ages and hometowns.

(This representation of a disagreement between Tecumseh and William Henry Harrison is a reminder that sometimes U.S. troops were called upon to do harm to the native population. Tecumseh died in the War of 1812.)

Here is a list of minor and major wars in American history.

Here are numbers of American dead and wounded in our wars.

Here is the article that broke the story of mistreatment of veterans at Walter Reed Hospital. We say we care about our veterans, but that does not always appear to be the case.

Here is the Veterans of Foreign Wars home page.

Here is Iraq Body Count. This organization counts the number of Iraqis killed in the Iraq War. All people have equal value.

( Both a strong military and a strong resistance against going to war are important aspects of democracy. )

Here is the activist group Peace Action.

Here is a list of Medal of Honor winners for great bravery in American wars.

Here is information on women in American wars.

Here is the National Association of Black Veterans.

(Henry Hulbert, below, was a winner of the Medal of Honor in WW I.)

Here is information on the Revolutionary War.

Here is information on the War of 1812.

Here is information about the Civil War. (Photo below is of dead Union soldier.)

Here is information on World War I.

Here is information on World War II.

Here is information about the Korean War.

Here is information on the Vietnam War.

Here is information about the War in Iraq.

Here in an article from Salon about possible American war crimes in Afghanistan and Iraq.

War crimes take place in all wars and are committed by all sides. It is not a contradiction to acknowledge this fact and still respect the great majority who served honorably. At the same time, it is disrespectful to the concepts of democracy and human rights to ignore these facts.

The National World War II Memorial in Washington is excellent to visit.

As is the Korean War Veterans Memorial in Washington.

And the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

I called my father from the Korean War Memorial and asked him about the historical accuracy of how the troops were sculpted. He said based on my descriptions, it was an accurate portrayal. ( Photo below)

I’ve been able to visit Punchbowl Cemetery in Honolulu. Many of our dead from wars in the Pacific are buried here. This is one of the most important and impressive locations you can visit in Honolulu.

I’ve also visited Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in San Diego.

I once toured the Normandy American Cemetery and Monument near Omaha Beach in France.

Below is Arlington National Cemetery. I was fortunate to once visit Arlington on Memorial Day weekend and see the American flags at each gravestone.

Without people willing to die to protect the freedom of others, I would not be able to express my views in this blog post.  Without such people, none of us would be able to enjoy the day-to-day freedoms we often take for granted.

May 20, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Memorial Day

Today is Memorial Day.

Please be mindful of the those who have fought in our wars.

Please also be aware of those who have worked for peace.

Let’s work for the day when there are no more wars. Such a time is possible.

May 25, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | | 2 Comments

Memorial Day Parade 1942—Houston Memorial Day Events

Image, Source: digital file from original transparency

(Blogger’s Note–5/29/11– Here are events for Houston Memorial Day 2011. There is no Memorial Day parade in Houston.)

Above is a Memorial Day parade in Southington, Connecticut in 1942.

Here is information about the picture. The picture was taken by Fenno Jacobs.

The small crowd is due to the fact that town’s war factories did not close for the parade.

Here is a list of Memorial Day events in the Houston area as collected by the City of Houston.

Here is the link to the Houston National Cemetery. There is a Memorial Day event at the cemetery—Here are the details.

There is a Memorial Day event at Seawolf Park on Pelican Island near Galveston Island.

Here is the link to Arlington National Cemetery.

Here is the link to Southington, Connecticut.

Southington does not list a Memorial Day parade on its list of town events for May.

Here are links about the history of Memorial Day and about the men and women who served and died in the service of others.

People talk a lot about respect for veterans. Just like they talk a lot about family and God and all that.

I’m wary that anything people talk about at length in our society is really anything that is strongly believed.

It’s not that people are lying when they say they care a lot about veterans and family and God.

Though many are lying.

It’s just that they talk and talk and yet people’s actions don’t meet up with the words.

I look at people and want to feel that they have the substance and quality to hold beliefs in a serious and thoughtful manner.

I have to admit though that in many cases I can’t get myself to that point about folks.

In fact, when I hear of a view that is claimed to be deeply held, I often wonder what misdeed or neglect is being covered for with the assertion of care and sentiment.

I think it is unlikely that we as a society care much about veterans, or that most people will take time on Memorial Day to think about the people who have died in our wars.

May 24, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | 2 Comments