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March 15 Is The Ides Of March—A Great Day To Learn About Rome And Caesar

Tomorrow, March 15, is the Ides of March.

Here is an explanation of what the term Ides of March means.

(Above–The Death of Caesar. This work was painted in 1798 by Vincenzo Camuccini.)

Here are two accessible book to learn about the events surrounding the fall of the Roman Republic and the rise of Julius Caesar.

Rubicon–The Last Years of the Roman Republic by Tom Holland.

A quality biography is Caesar–Life Of A Colossus by Adam Goldsworthy.

Though these events took place a long time ago, the impact of the rise of Caesar and the history of Rome is still recalled today.

Here is a comprehensive timeline of Ancient Roman history.

Here are some essays Ancient Rome from the BBC.

(Below—Whoopee! It is Cleopatra and Caesar as painted by Jean-Leon Gerome in 1866.)

March 14, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Ides Of March—Good Books And Resources To Learn About Julius Caesar And The History Of Ancient Rome

It is the Ides of March. You should beware.

Here is an explanation of what the Term Ides of March means.

(Above–The Death of Caesar. This work was painted in 1798 by Vincenzo Camuccini.)

What books can you read to learn about the events surrounding the rise of Julius Caesar and the fall of the Roman Republic?

I can suggest three.

A classic is The Roman Revolution by Sir Ronald Syme. This book was published in 1939 and has stood the test of time.

A more recent title is Rubicon–The Last Years of the Roman Republic by Tom Holland. This book was published in 2003.

Rubicon is a bit more modern in style and worthwhile to read. Though the Syme book remains the standard by which histories of the last years of the Roman Republic and the rise of Augustus are measured.

A quality biography is Caesar–Life Of A Colossus by Adam Goldsworthy.  This book was published in 2006.

Though these events may have been long in the past, the impact of the rise of Caesar and the history of Rome is still felt today.

Here is a comprehensive timeline of Ancient Roman history.

Here are some essays Ancient Rome from the BBC.

(Below—Whoopee! It is Cleopatra and Caesar as painted by Jean-Leon Gerome in 1866.)

March 15, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Et Tu, Blogger?—An Ides Of March Blogging Break

 

Even the best of bloggers needs a break sometimes.

And so do I.

I’m blogged out.

Texas Liberal will return on Monday, March 17.

The painting is Death Of Julius Caesar. It was painted in 1798 by Vincenzo Camuccini.

Here is information on the life of Caesar.

Here is an explanation of the term Ides Of March—   

The soothsayer’s warning to Julius Caesar, “Beware the Ides of March,” has forever imbued that date with a sense of foreboding. But in Roman times the expression “Ides of March” did not necessarily evoke a dark mood—it was simply the standard way of saying “March 15.” Surely such a fanciful expression must signify something more than merely another day of the year? Not so. Even in Shakespeare’s time, sixteen centuries later, audiences attending his play Julius Caesar wouldn’t have blinked twice upon hearing the date called the Ides.The term Ides comes from the earliest Roman calender, which is said to have been devised by Romulus, the mythical founder of Rome. Whether it was Romulus or not, the inventor of this calendar had a penchant for complexity. The Roman calendar organized its months around three days, each of which served as a reference point for counting the other days:

Kalends (1st day of the month)

Nones (the 7th day in March, May, July, and October; the 5th in the other months)

Ides (the 15th day in March, May, July, and October; the 13th in the other months)

The remaining, unnamed days of the month were identified by counting backwards from the Kalends, Nones, or the Ides. For example, March 3 would be V Nones—5 days before the Nones (the Roman method of counting days was inclusive; in other words, the Nones would be counted as one of the 5 days). 

March 13, 2008 Posted by | Art, Blogging, History | , , , , | 2 Comments