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I Asked St. Jude, Saint Of Lost Causes, To Bless Idea Of Mass Transit In Houston

I’ve called upon St. Jude, the Patron Saint of Lost Causes, to offer blessings to the idea of an extensive mass transit system in Houston and the Houston area. When I reached St. Jude, he told me he was busy working on the idea of a first-rate recycling program in Houston.

( Above is St. Jude as painted by Georges de La Tour. The painting was completed at some point between 1615 and 1620. Here is information about St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Young Natalie Turner is patient of the month at St. Jude.  Here is information on St. Jude himself from Catholic.org.)   

The Houston Chronicle ran a story today about prospects for a more comprehensive mass transit system in Houston and the suburbs. (To the extent suburb can be distinguished from city around here.) The story gives a clue why Houston and this area as a whole are so often such a backwards-looking mess.

A Republican County Commissioner from Fort Bend County named James Patterson, who in fairness appears to be in favor of more mass transit, had this to contribute on the idea of a regional transit authority —

“Patterson said he believes most residents of Fort Bend and other suburban counties “are pretty much an independent lot, and they are going to say, ‘We would love to work with Metro … but if there is going to be a Park & Ride lot in Rosenberg, we need our elected officials to be in control of that”

Yeah…those are rugged independent types out in Fort Bend County. I’ll tell you what—why not just give those folks horses and they can ride into work like John Wayne. That will reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

The Duke here is saying “Don’t mess with my park n’ride.”

Metro itself is not yet on board with the idea of a regional transit authority either. Why think big when millions of cars are on the road, gas prices are up, the air is horrible, and people are wasting hours of their lives on the highway?

Metro seems to be playing it coy. They are waiting for the day suburban residents are ready to be taxed to help pay for an expanded public transportation system.

I wonder how long a wait that will be.

The next total solar eclipse visible over the United States is projected for 2017. The one after that will be in 2024. Based on what I read today, I would bet “no” on a regional transit authority in the Houston-area by these dates. 

In the meantime, Metro pushes a light rail system that costs billions and offers service to a small number of people. I voted for it not because I believe anything Metro says, but because it irritated conservatives to such a great degree. And at least it’s a job creation program.

St. Jude got back to me on this issue. He said that he was all for desperate cases, and that he feels no person is beyond hope, but that this was more than even he could handle. St. Jude referred me to an acquaintance of his to handle the foreseeable future of a top-flight public transportation system in Houston—  

September 2, 2008 Posted by | Houston, Politics, Texas | , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

History Of The Texas Primary

The Texas Presidential Primary, to be held March 4, is a big deal.

Democrats Senator Barack Obama and Senator Hillary Clinton are working to the take the largest share of the 228 delegates to be awarded.

( Photo above is of Galveston at sunset. If you live near the Texas coast, this might be your concept of Texas.)

Mike Huckabee hopes Evangelical Christians in Texas will help him add to a number of Southern victories gained so far against John McCain. 140 delegates are up in the Republican race.

32 of the Democratic delegates will be superdelegates. (Please click here for a Texas Liberal history of the superdelegate idea. )

I maintain that the superdelegate idea is undemocratic and goes against the idea of an open and fair Democratic Party.

( The process by which Texas delegates are selected is mind-numbing and not the province of this post. Here’s a link to part one and part two of an explanation of this system by the Texas political blog Burnt Orange Report.)

Not surprisingly, given the lack of enthusiasm for democracy found historically among the Texas political class—-and from many of the Anglo voters who have dominated Texas politics—the Texas Presidential primary does not have a long history.

The first Texas presidential primary was held in 1980.

( Here is a concept of Texas some might have—An oil rig in the middle of town.  I’ve never seen this in my nine years in Texas. Though I have seen oil rigs within the city limits of Houston.)

Texas was for many years part of the one-party “Solid South” that anchored Jim Crow segregation in America.

This system had multiple parts.

The two-thirds rule at the Democratic National Convention assured that the South would have a veto over any presidential candidate who threatened progress on Civil Rights. It took two-thirds of all delegates to ratify a nominee.  That rule is now gone.

On Election Day in November, the South, including Texas, would almost always vote for the Democratic nominee.  A Texas exception to this was in 1928 when Republican Herbert Hoover defeated Catholic Al Smith. (Some Texans  must have sat around the dinner table deciding if they disliked Catholics or black people the most.)

( Here is Al Smith with Babe Ruth. You can likely figure out who is Smith and who is Ruth. )

This Southern unity prevented the Democratic nominee from pushing Civil Rights during the campaign (If he had any inclination to do so to start with.) since he could not alienate such a large block of states.

In Congress, Southern Democratic Senators and Representatives, often reelected without opposition, built seniority and gained control of important committees. This also stopped any progress on Civil Rights.

Here is a link to a history of the “Whites Only” Democratic primary used in Texas for many years to determine nominees–and certain November winners in a one party state–for the great majority of Texas offices.

In the U.S. Senate, the filibuster rule allowed Southern Senators to block Civil Rights legislation.  This may all seem a bit off the topic of the Texas Primary, but it gets at the political climate in Texas for many years and how it was that the Progressive-era reform of the presidential primary did not reach Texas until 1980.

Today Texas, along with Hawaii, California and New Mexico, is a state where the majority of people are not white. That’s amazing when you think of the John Wayne/roughneck image of Texas.

Many of these non-white folks are immigrants.

(The Port of Houston is immense and it connects Houston and Texas to the world. Many immigrants come to Texas today and they are–for the most part so far–accepted.)

Most of these immigrants are accepted. Even undocumented immigrants from Mexico and elsewhere have not  been disturbed much as of yet. If this has to do with the role these immigrants play in the Texas economy, or the possible–mostly unrealized– political clout of Hispanic voters in Texas, I could not fully say.

Roughly one-third of Texans are Hispanic. Though many are not legally here. And of those that are here legally, many do not vote. Texas is just over 11% black. Almost 24 million people live in Texas. Here is a link to some basic facts about Texas.

(Below is the border between El Paso and Ciudad Juarez. Hard to see any distinctions between people from this perspective.)

George W. Bush won Texas with 61% of the vote in 2004. Republicans are in firm control of Texas politically.

That first presidential primary in 1980 produced an interesting result. Ronald Reagan of California defeated George H. W. Bush of Houston, Texas by a 51%-47% margin. This was on May 3, 1980.

Mr. Reagan had mostly wrapped up the nomination by that point, but it still shows the strength conservative in the Texas Republican party against a strong home-state candidate.

On the other side, President Jimmy Carter beat Ted Kennedy 56%-23%. I think today the liberal would do somewhat better.

Texas was a Super Tuesday battleground for Democrats in 1988. Mike Dukakis rook first place with 33% against 25% for Jesse Jackson and 20% for Southerner Al Gore. This win helped confirm Mr. Dukakis as the front-runner, though it would take another round of primaries to make it more certain. (Please click here for a Texas Liberal history of Super Tuesday.)

Vice President Bush was an easy home state winner in 1988.

Though as an incumbent President, Mr Bush’s 69% against 24% for Pat Buchanan in 1992 was not so impressive.

The son, George W. Bush, beat John McCain 88% to 7% in 2000. Not a close call. Mr. McCain may do better this time.

In 2004, while Bush was unopposed among Republicans, John Kerry won two-thirds of the vote on his way to the nomination.

2008 promises to be the most interesting and most relevant Texas presidential primary yet held.

Texas Liberal is leading the way in political history blogging in 2008.

February 9, 2008 Posted by | Campaign 2008, Elections, History, Houston, Immigration, Political History, Politics, Texas | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments