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Bolivar Ferry Gibb Gilchrist In Houston Ship Channel Boat Yard For Work—Free Ferry Is Socialism

Where are boats in the Bolivar Ferry fleet sent when they need maintenance or repairs?

From the picture above that I took last week, I’d say they go to a boat repair yard in the Houston Ship Channel.

Above you see the Bolivar Ferry called the Gibb Gilchrist in a boat repair yard in Houston Ship Channel.

The Gilchrist is the yellow boat in the middle of the picture.

The Bolivar Ferry runs from Galveston Island to Bolivar Peninsula. It is a “free” service run by the Texas Department of Transportation.

Where are the cries of socialism?

I thought a real Texan could cross a few miles of Galveston Bay on his or her own and without help from a meddling government.

Where are the citizen-volunteers to fix the boat, instead of the tab taxpayers are no doubt picking up for whatever work is being done?

Here are facts about who Gibb Gilchrist was from the excellent Handbook of Texas Online.  The upshot  is that Mr. Gilchrist was once President of Texas A & M.

The Bolivar Ferry is a great ride. You can walk on and take a round-trip that will run about 50 minutes. You’ll see big ships and you might see some dolphins.

While you are riding the Bolivar Ferry, you are using a taxpayer-provided government service that enhances the common good.

July 30, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Simple Gifts Performed At Arizona Shooting Memorial Service

(Blogger’s Note 1/13/11—Simple Gifts was sung at the end of the memorial to the Tuscon, Arizona shooting victims. This is a meaningful song with lyrics all should hear. I’m reposting my entry about Simple Gifts that I first posted in 2009.)

Above is a video of me speaking the words of the Shaker hymn Simple Gifts while standing on the eastern end of Galveston Island.

The video runs just over 90 seconds.

Behind me as I speak is a ship in Galveston Bay that is sailing out towards the Gulf of Mexico.

Simple Gifts is one of my favorite songs in the world.

If you click this link, you’ll see the lyrics and the song will play.

The song was written by Joseph Brackett. Here are some very basic facts about Joseph Brackett.

Here is some information about Shaker music.

Here is some history of the Shakers.

From that history—

“One of the numerous religious sects who emigrated to American shores in search of religious freedom, the Shakers followed Mother Ann Lee to the United States in 1774. Here they established several colonies– the first in 1776 at Nikayuna near Albany, NY–whose governing principles included celibacy and agrarian communal living.”

Here are some things you could see if you visited Galveston, Texas.

Here are some facts about Galveston Bay.

Here is the link to the Galveston Bay Foundation.

Here is a link where you can track the location of ships around the world.

Here is some history of ships and boats.

The part of Simple Gifts I like best is where it says that to bow and to bend we should not be ashamed. I would like to live my life by that principle, but so far I have lacked the discipline to do so.

January 13, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2010 Is Sailing Away

2010 is sailing away.

2010 is sailing away just like that ship you see above. I took this picture earlier this year while on riding across Galveston Bay on a ferry boat.

My blog traffic stinks this week. Just as well. Hopefully people are enjoying the holiday week.

Enjoy New Year’s Eve anyway you wish so long as you don’t drive drunk or drive tipsy.

Thanks for reading Texas Liberal in 2010. Please visit the blog every chance you get in 2011.

(Photo copyright Neil Aquino.)

December 30, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | 3 Comments

Let Us Stay The Course

We keep hearing that liberals, progressives, and Democrats are in trouble in 2010.

But as Charles Blow writes in the New York Times, there is still hope.

From the column–

“Sure, some seats will change party control, but a landslide is hardly certain, particularly if Democrats can change their tune and energize their base. A New York Times/CBS News poll released this week asked respondents whom they would vote for in their own districts if the midterms were held today. Among those the poll determined to be likely voters, Republican candidates held a small edge. (Likely voter models are used to make predictions about the midterms.) However, among all registered voters, Democrats held a larger edge.”

We need to be upfront, as many Democrats running across the country are indeed being, about the accomplishment of Health Care Reform.

With HCR, there are no more lifetime limits on policies, you can’t be kicked off a policy because you get sick, and kids can’t be denied coverage because of pre-existing conditions.

These benefits are not nearly the entirety of HCR. Take the time to learn more about the program.

Ask people in your life who oppose HCR just why they feel the way they do.

As for the election ahead, let’s be like that ship you see above that is staying the course in Galveston Bay.

Just like that ship, let us all stay the course.

September 19, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

There Is No Oil Or Any Tarballs In Galveston—Tourism Officials Have An Obligation To Be Candid

As I write this on the evening of Friday, May 14, there is no oil or any tarballs on the beaches of Galveston Island or at any Texas beaches that I am aware of.

Here is what the Galveston tourism folks have to say about this matter.

( Above–A ship in Galveston Bay. I took this picture from the Bolivar Ferry.)

I like Galveston and I often drive 50 miles south to Galveston to take a walk on the beach and have lunch.

Rick’s Blog, writing in the Pensacola, Florida area, has concerns that his community is not telling the full story on the oil spill.

Rick is correct to express this view. People will often say whatever is needed to make sure that business does not drop off.

If any oil or tarballs do come to come to Galveston or to other Texas beaches, I will post on the issue.

In the meantime, people should come to Galveston and enjoy the ocean and the history  to be found in Galveston.

Yet also, tourism officials in Galveston and at all points on the Gulf have the obligation to be candid about any oil or tarballs that may appear.

Here is information about visiting Pensacola.

The Gulf of Mexico Foundation advocates for the Gulf.

Here are some basic facts about the Gulf of Mexico.

Here is my post of facts about the spill.

May 15, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Excellent Storm Drain Cover

Here is an excellent storm drain cover I saw in Downtown Houston.

You see this storm drain was made in India.

Those folks have to eat as well.

You see it has an illustration of a pelican and of a fish.

Anything you drop down that drain ends up in Galveston Bay and might kill fish and pelicans.

This is a useful lesson. You do something bad and you don’t know who or what it will impact somewhere along the line.

Seek to do good. As hard as that be at times.

Here is a history of storm drainage in Calhoun County, Michigan.

From that history—

“The history of drainage in Michigan is deeply rooted in our State’s abundant rainfall, in its diverse terrain, and in the rich variety of soils left by retreating glaciers. Containing vast tracts of poorly-drained land, the territory was considered uninhabitable by early explorers. Much of today’s prime farmland, in fact, was earlier written off as hopelessly unfit for cultivation. Despite setbacks from malaria and other insect-borne diseases, man’s conquering instincts prevailed. Among priorities of early leaders was creation of a system of roads promoting access to interior regions. Our first territorial drain law, enacted prior to 1820, provided drainage for these early highways. “

I wager this history is a bit more excitement than you imagined about storm drainage.

April 1, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Your Ship Will Arrive

Above is a picture I took a few weeks ago of ships waiting to enter Galveston Bay and the Houston Ship Channel.

Your ship in life may come in if you assist its navigation with love, friendship, hope, learning and imagination.

You can set your own course for your ship in life.  

You can set your own course and still have many others on board your ship.

You might have to wait for your ship to arrive. But as you see in the picture above, even a ship that must wait will gain entry to a safe and productive port.

October 14, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Speaking The Words To Simple Gifts As Ship Passes Behind Me

Above is a video of me speaking the words of the Shaker hymn Simple Gifts while standing on the eastern end of Galveston Island.

The video runs just over 90 seconds.

Behind me as I speak is a ship in Galveston Bay that is sailing out towards the Gulf of Mexico.

Simple Gifts is one of my favorite songs in the world.

If you click this link, you’ll see the lyrics and the song will play.

The song was written by Joseph Brackett. Here are some very basic facts about Joseph Brackett.

Here is some information about Shaker music.

Here is some history of the Shakers.

From that history—

One of the numerous religious sects who emigrated to American shores in search of religious freedom, the Shakers followed Mother Ann Lee to the United States in 1774. Here they established several colonies– the first in 1776 at Nikayuna near Albany, NY–whose governing principles included celibacy and agrarian communal living.

Here are some things you could see if you visited Galveston, Texas.

Here are some facts about Galveston Bay.

Here is the link to the Galveston Bay Foundation.

Here is a link where you can track the location of ships around the world.

Here is some history of ships and boats.

The part of Simple Gifts I like best is where it says that to bow and to bend we should not be ashamed. I would like to live my life by that principle, but so far I have lacked the discipline to do so.

July 15, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Sanko Bright—A Ship In The Ocean

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Above is a ship called the Sanko Bright. This ship is registered to Singapore.

This picture was taken in Galveston Bay last week from the Bolivar Ferry.

According to the world ship registry, the Sanko Bright is a crude oil tanker.

Here are photos of the Sanko Bright in different places around the world.

The Coast Guard put out a press release involving this ship back in 2007—The Coast Guard medevaced a crewman from an oil tanker in the Galveston Fairway anchorage off Galveston, Texas, this morning. A watchstander at Coast Guard Sector Houston/Galveston received a call for assistance at 6 a.m. from the captain of the Sanko Bright, a 783-foot oil tanker, reporting one of his crewmembers was having difficulty breathing and his face was swelling. The Coast Guard patrol boat Skipjack was diverted from patrol to medevac the man.  The boat arrived on scene at 7:19 a.m. and crewmembers went aboard the tanker to assess the man. The Skipjack transported him to the Coast Guard base in Galveston, where awaiting emergency medical personnel transported him to the University of Texas Medical Branch, also in Galveston.

I hope the crewman was okay.

Though the ship is supposed to be from Singapore, it is owned by a Japanese company—The Sanko Steamship Company.

 A book I read about global shipping is The Outlaw Sea by William Langewiesche. The book talks about ships with poor safety records and about tax avoidance and poor regulation at sea. Here is a review of this book from The National Sea Grant Law Center. 

It is fun to see big ships in the ocean, though I do feel they should all be regulated and that the people who own the ships should pay all taxes due.

This is why I am hoping to be appointed Czar of the World’s Oceans by the United Nations. I will keep my readers up to date on my quest for this title.  

April 12, 2009 Posted by | Books, Galveston | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Galveston & Rumors About Galveston—After Hurricane Ike Post # 3

Here is After Hurricane Ike post #3.

Today is the first full day I have power at home. It’s nice to make these posts at home instead of at the Downtown Houston Public Library. Though I very much appreciate the resources available at the library.

Today I was able to buy perishable groceries for the first time in over a week. In the days leading up to the storm I figured that power would be going out. As indeed it did. So I just bought water and granola bars. 

Now I have fruits, vegetables and milk at home. 

Here is the link to the Houston Food Bank.

Many are still without power. Life cannot be more normal again in Houston until people have power. Still, I bet there are some, if just the smallest number, who have used the time without power to renew a relationship, read something they might have never gotten around to reading, or to think out a problem.

Everybody needs power back and I know what a frustration it has been for so many, but I hope that for at least some it has also been an opportunity of a kind.

I got a comment on another post today from someone without power for a few days now in Columbus, Ohio in the aftermath of Ike.

The Houston Chronicle today offered up an unhelpful editorial about the failure of Galveston city leaders to as of yet devise a good plan for evacuated residents to come back and see their homes. As I said yesterday on this blog, Galveston officials seem overwhelmed. They need outside help.

I hope the Governor’s office or somebody with insight into the problems Galveston is facing, has offered assistance to Galveston city leaders. Galveston is a poor city of 50,000 people. They have just the resources and talent that they have. Hurricane Ike is a disaster of a scope beyond what Galveston on its own can manage.

Fellow Houston blogger Brains & Eggs has posted about rumors of many bodies being washed out to sea from Galveston and Bolivar Peninsula. I don’t believe these rumors. Some maybe died this way. But not hundreds or thousands.

Here is a report on how bad things are in Galveston right now.

Another Houston blogger, Julie Pippert, wonders about pollution from swamped refineries and chemical plants that may have sludged into Galveston Bay as a result of the storm.  

Julie, of course, is crazy. I recall all the ads on TV a few years ago saying how expansion of the Port of Houston would enhance the environment. All that ship traffic is good for the water. I say that whatever ends up in Galveston Bay is for the best. Mankind will be gone soon enough and Galveston Bay will have millions of years to recover.

Below is Bolivar Peninsula after Hurricane Ike.  

September 18, 2008 Posted by | Galveston, Houston, Texas | , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments