Texas Liberal

All People Matter

Invasive Pacu Fish Caught In Concho River In Texas—Why Do People Need To Keep Flesh-Eating Fish And Killer Pythons?

The Facebook page of the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife reports that a Pacu fish was caught recently in the Concho River near San Angelo.

Above you see the Pacu that was caught.

A Pacu is a flesh-eating freshwater fish that should be living in South America where it belongs.  The Pacu is a relative of the Piranha.

Her are some facts about this fish.

Here are facts and some history of the Concho River.

Here is how the San Angelo Standard-Times reported the capture of this fish.

The person who caught this fish had been looking to catch catfish.

The Pacu is an invasive species that messes up natural ecosystems. People illegally dump these fish into streams and rivers. A lot of folks just have no sense.

The Federal Department of Agriculture has a National Invasive  Species Information Center. 

These efforts will continue so long as we don’t slash federal spending to the bone as part of the Ayn Rand budgeting advocated by Mr. Romney and Mr. Ryan.

We can have our rivers filled up with flesh-eating fish to go along with all the Pythons now slithering about the U.S.

Of course the core issue is our fellow citizens who feel they need to keep killer fish and killer snakes as pets, and then–shockingly–find that they can’t manage keeping such creatures.

So they just let them loose on the rest of us.

I’d suggest to people that they read a book or take up a model train hobby instead of inflicting killer creatures upon the nation.

September 17, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

City Fish—Discovery Green Park & The Houston Ship Channel

Here are some city fish that I took a picture of a few days ago in Houston’s Discovery Green Park.

The fish are swimming in the water under the reflection of tall downtown buildings.

If you walk long the trails going along many of Houston’s bayous, you will almost always see some fish swimming about.

Here is a list of 20 fishing spots in our near Houston. There is no fishing allowed in Discovery Green Park.

Below is a picture I took last year of a fish that was swimming in the Houston Ship Channel. Based on my scientific examination of the picture, I think it lives by licking toxic residue off of rocks.

I don’t wager that this fish is very good to eat. But you sure have to give it some credit for being able to live in Houston Ship Channel.

Whenever things are rough, just think that if a fish can live in the Houston Ship Channel then we can get past hard times.

June 14, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | 2 Comments

This Brother Of Ours Is Fishing In Houston Ship Channel Because He Needs Something To Eat

Above you see a brother of ours—we are all connected—fishing in the Houston Ship Channel.

I took this picture yesterday.

I’ve got a better picture of the guy, but just in case he was skipping work or fleeing the law I don’t want to get him in trouble.

You’ve got to be out of your mind to fish in the Houston Ship Channel.

Or—Maybe you need something to eat.

That man knows full well that the Houston Ship Channel is not a clean body of water.

There are specific guidelines for how much fish you should eat from the Houston Ship Channel.

Yet I can’t imagine that this man would eat fish from the Houston Ship Channel if he felt he had other options.

People do what they feel they must do.

April 16, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | 2 Comments

If This Fish Can Survive In Houston Ship Channel, Than We Can Also Survive Tough Environments And Hard Times

If you study the picture above, you will see a fish.

I don’t know what kind of fish that is, but I can tell you that it lives in the dirty waters of the Houston Ship Channel.

I took this picture last week on a drive around the Ship Channel area.

If that fish can live in that water, than we can survive in even the roughest environments and make it through the hardest times. 

That green/black fish is an inspiration to us all.

October 5, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Seafood Industry Should Stress Upside Of Mercury

The New York Times reports that relatively small amounts of bluefin tuna sushi consumption can leave you with a lot of mercury in your body. The same may well apply to other types of sushi as well.

All we ever hear about are the downsides of mercury.

What about the basic fairness of hearing about what is good and positive about mercury?

The seafood industry needs to fight back.  ( Don’t worry though–They are fighting back. And yes, if you look at the web page, you’ll find that pregnant women should indeed eat fish. Here is the list of groups that say it is okay. )

Here is a little bit about mercury from the  excellent Nature’s Building Blocks–An A-Z Guide To The Elements by John Emsley—(Just one more book in The Texas Liberal library.)

Mercury has no biological role even though it is present in every living thing. It is widespread because it is present in the atmosphere due to it’s volatility, both as the metal and as the organomercury compounds which are formed by micro-organisms.

Mercury is perfectly natural.

Mercury poisoning was once relatively common but is now rare hanks to…health ands safety regulations and the phasing out of many of it’s uses. All mercury compounds are toxic…(it) can pass the blood-brain barrier and move across the placenta, with the result that mercury affects the central nervous system and cause fetal deformities.

Notice use of the word “can.” Mercury CAN cause fetal deformities. It’s not a given. Simply enjoy your sushi responsibly and as a matter of personal choice.

…When syphilis became a problem in Europe in the fifteenth-century, the only known cure was (mercury)…intense salivation was known as a side-effect…the “cure” as it was known was risky and almost as feared as the disease itself.

Mercury cures syphilis.

The phrase “mad as a hatter” owes its derivation to the use of mercury in the hat industry, and described the behavior of those whose job it was to turn beaver and rabbit fur into felt, the raw material from which hats used to be made. In order to get the short hairs of this type of fur to mat together, the pelts were dipped in a solution of mercury nitrate and then dried. Workers in the industry often suffered from “hatter’s shakes” and “mercury madness”

Mercury created jobs until the do-gooders came along.

Some mercury is still used to treat seed corn to make it resistant to fungal disease…By the 1960’s the practice had become widespread…Sadly this form of crop protection led to several mass-poisonings in developing countries.

Mercury was quite helpful up until the villagers made the choice to eat the corn. They just did not know when to stop. Today’s well-educated urban sushi consumers know when to stop, and they also know that for people like themselves there are no limits in this world.

Here is a list of ecologically sound fish to eat and depleted species to avoid eating. It comes from the Monterrey Bay Aquarium.

Below is a drawing of a bluefin tuna.

Here are facts about this fish.

.

Here is information about overfishing of these creatures

January 24, 2008 Posted by | Books, Sea Life | , , , , , , , | 3 Comments