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Learn About Paul Revere And His Ride For Yourself—You Are Crazy To Let Others Define Your Past

Due to recent comments by Sarah Palin, Paul Revere’s Ride is in the news.

When important events in American history find their way back into the news, that is a good time to take your own initiative to learn the real facts.

Above is John Singleton Copley’s 1768 painting of Paul Revere.

Here is how this painting is described by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.

Revere, a silversmith, is seen here as both a working person and as a thinker.

Every working person has the ability to understand complex things if he or she is willing to make the effort.

An excellent book about Paul Revere and the Boston he knew is Paul Revere And The World He Lived In by Esther Forbes.

A book about the famous ride that got strong reviews is Paul Revere’s Ride by David Hackett Fischer.  I have not read this title.

If you have the good fortune to be able to visit Boston, you can tour the home where Paul Revere and his family lived.

Here are facts about the Midnight Ride from the Revere Home. 

Below is a picture of the Revere home that I took in 2008.

In Boston you can also visit the famous Old North Church. 

This is the church where the lanterns were hung on the night of Paul Revere’s ride.

Below is a picture I took from inside the Old North Church in 2008.

Please allow me to be clear—You don’t need to go to Boston to learn about Paul Revere and his ride. All the information you need is at the library, the bookstore, and on the internet.

The things you need to learn about yourself and your world are all around you. These things are accessible with effort and imagination.

You are crazy if you allow other people to tell you about your past.

If you allow other people define your past—and by extension to define the person you are—you will lose control of your future.

June 7, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How Paul Revere Saw Life At 50

The following about how Paul Revere saw life at age 50 is from Paul Revere And The World He Lived In by Esther Forbes—

“Very few people ever live their middle years in the same world they grow up in as children. None whose lives have been broken in two by a great war ever do, and none of Paul Revere’s generation did. They could fall to rioting, as they did in the western part of (Massachusetts.) They could slip into embittered old age as did Samuel Adams. Or they could take things as they found them and go ahead. Paul Revere did the last.”

Reagardless of if you’ve been in a war or not, this seemed to me a useful passage for people of all ages.

Above is a picture of the Boston house Paul Revere lived in for much of his life.

Please click here for a Paul Revere reading list.

Paul Revere lived 1735-1818.

August 18, 2008 Posted by | Books, History | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Photo Of Big Artichoke & Paul Revere Book

Above is a photo I took last night of a very large artichoke and, also, my copy of Paul Revere And The World He Lived In by Esther Forbes. I’m not fully sure the picture captures the size of the artichoke, but it was a big one.

Below is a picture of an artichoke field. I had never contemplated how artichokes were grown. Here is information about artichokes. It seems people have been eating artichokes for thousands of years.  

Paul Revere And The World He Lived In was a Pulitzer Prize winner for history. It’s one of the best books I’ve read. You feel you are in Colonial Boston and that you have a sense of Paul Revere. Here is a review of the book from Time Magazine in 1942. 

August 15, 2008 Posted by | Books, History | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Keep Your Core Beliefs To A Minimum

The passage I excerpt below is from Paul Revere And The World He Lived In by Esther Forbes. The book was published in 1942 and won a Pulitzer prize. I can’t recommend it enough. It makes you feel as if you are living in Colonial Boston. 

What I found of note in the passage is the fleeting luck-of-the-draw nature of what must have seemed core beliefs to the man in question. The subject, Governor Thomas Hutchinson (above), was forced out of a Colonial Massachusetts he has lost control over not long before the American Revolution. As the author notes in Revere, in many respects Hutchinson just came around at the wrong time.

From the book— 

“No man ever loved Massachusetts with a greater intensity than did Thomas Hutchinson. He had written her history, fought for her boundaries, re-established her currency, seen to it that her courts and judicial system were kept to a high standard. He had honestly believed in the centralization of power, and that the centre should be in London. The side which one did not, and yet their grandchildren ( two of Paul Revere’s  were to be dying within the century for the centralization of power in the Federal Government. Hutchinson lost everything by backing the wrong system at the wrong time. His houses, wharves, horses, coaches, great estates, even the tomb of his wife on Copp’s Hill, were confiscated. His name became an anathema. Hutchinson street would be renamed Pearl….and yet if the other side had won, Thomas Hutchinson would undoubtedly be regarded as one of you greatest patriots.”

Belief in British control of the colonies, and in a model of government that placed that control in London, meant nothing after the Revolution. Most of the talk and agitation meant to either keep the colonies under British governance, or, for that matter to free them, had little bearing on the final outcome of the struggle.   

I’m not suggesting it’s worthless to fight for a losing cause or for a cause that has little chance of success in your lifetime. You must go by what you believe. In fact, fighting for such a cause may well constitute a life well-spent.

What I am suggesting is that one way to keep a focus on what is most important, is to keep your core beliefs to a minimum. Protect what you believe from the whims of fate and from the endless distractions of our busy and media overloaded society. 

The liberalism I support is about a role for government in regulating the economy in order to make life more fair, a broad acceptance of people as they are, and democracy and free elections.   

I’m open to various methods and policies to reach these goals. Many “issues of the day” come and go and are quickly forgotten. Many things that seem important are not important.

Keep your core beliefs at a minimum and keep your eyes on the prize.

Here is information on Esther Forbes.

Here is information on Thomas Hutchinson.

July 22, 2008 Posted by | Books, Colonial America, History, Political History, Politics | , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments