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Giant Burrito Takes Precedence Over Commentary On The Big Issues Of The Day

I’m certain that I was going to make a post this afternoon about the big issues of the day.

But then I got caught up in eating the giant burrito you see in the picture.

And now I have to get on my with my day.

I take a picture of very meal I eat in case I am someday recalled in the yet-to-be constructed  blogger wing of the Smithsonian. They might want to know about my every moment.

No. Really I took this picture because I knew I’d not have time for blogging today if I went out and got the burrito. I needed the picture for the post.

Here is some burrito history. 

With the burrito I was reading 1493–Uncovering The New World Columbus Created by Charles C. Mann.

Here is a review of this very good book.

Columbus sure did change the world.

September 9, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | 3 Comments

Columbus Day—Symbolic Execution Of Columbus

[ image: Removing the arrows from their target]

(Blogger’s Note–This is my Columbus Day post from last year. I”m running it again because  it is easy to do so, because my views on the subject have not changed and because I enjoy the picture of the symbolic execution of Columbus.)

It is Columbus Day.

Not all people like Columbus Day.

Growing up in Rhode Island you would get a Columbus Day parade. This was because we had so many Italians in Rhode Island.

Here in Texas, Columbus Day is not such a big deal.

Here is the historian Howard Zinn’s take on Christopher Columbus.  It is not very flattering.

Mr. Zinn wrote A People’s History of The United States.

In 1998, a group of indigenous Hondurans carried out a symbolic execution of Christopher Columbus for crimes against humanity.

They shot arrows at a large picture of Columbus. The photo above shows the event.

See how they have his hands chained up? Ha!

Now that’s entertainment.

I’m not sure Columbus Day is very much worth celebrating.

Though I’m not certain I felt the same way as a school kid getting the day off.

Here are some facts about Christopher Columbus and his voyages.

Below–A Flat Earth as painted by George Grie. I’m holding back a view on the true shape of the Earth until I have more evidence.)

October 11, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Columbus Day—Symbolic Execution Of Christopher Columbus

[ image: Removing the arrows from their target]

It is Columbus Day.

Not all people like Columbus Day.

Growing up in Rhode Island you would get a Columbus Day parade. This was because we had so many Italians in Rhode Island.  

Here in Texas, Columbus Day is not such a big deal.

Here is the historian Howard Zinn’s take on Christopher Columbus.  It is not very flattering.

Mr. Zinn wrote A People’s History of The United States.

In 1998, a group of indigenous Hondurans carried out a symbolic execution of Christopher Columbus for crimes against humanity.

They shot arrows at a large picture of Columbus. The photo above shows the event.

See how they have his hands chained up? Ha!

Now that’s entertainment.

I’m not sure Columbus Day is very much worth celebrating.

Though I’m not certain I felt the same way as a school kid getting the day off.

Here are some facts about Christopher Columbus and his voyages.

( Below–A Flat Earth as painted by George Grie. I’m holding back a view on the true shape of the Earth until I have more evidence.)

October 12, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

“Just War” Theory Of Ferdinand & Isabella Was The Logic Of Power

The following is from American Colonies: The Settling Of North America by Alan Taylor.

The specific issue being addressed in the paragraph is the killing and enslavement of the Taino people on Hispaniola and nearby islands by Christopher Columbus.    

Columbus’s slaughter and enslavement of Indians troubled the pious Spanish monarchs, who declared in 1500 that the Indians were “free and not subject to servitude.” But Ferdinand and Isabella failed to close the legal loophole exploited by the Spanish colonizers. It remained legal to enslave Indians taken in any “just war,” which the colonists characterized as any violence they conducted against resisting natives.”

And there you have the self-serving logic of power defined. 

October 17, 2007 Posted by | Books, Colonial America, History, Politics | , , , , | 3 Comments