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Do You Trust The Private Sector With Your Retirement?—Henry Hudson Would Liven Up Any Saloon

Picture Of The Day–After driving by the place for many years, I recently stopped at Henry Hudson’s Pub near the intersection of Highway 6 and 290 here in Houston.

I had a beer.

I might not have noticed the place but for the fact it has the name of the great explorer Henry Hudson.

If I had my way, all bars and taverns would be named after figures from history.

The Daniel Webster Inn. Oliver Cromwell’s Saloon. Plato’s Pub. Elizabeth Cady Stanton Bar & Grill.

Driving past Henry Hudson’s Pub over the years, I had wondered many times if they had a picture of Henry Hudson in the place. I did not see such a picture.

If my name were Chester Arthur and I opened a bar, I’d hang up a picture of Chester Arthur.

Here are some facts about Henry Hudson from the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online.

Below is a drawing of Henry Hudson. I think he would liven up any watering hole.

Link Of The Day—Nobel Prize winning economist  and New York Times columnist Paul Krugman writes that Social Security is in good shape and that Republican efforts to cut Social Security are about hatred of government instead of strong public policy.

Does anybody really think the private sector will look after them in retirement? How could anybody think such a thing?

Texas Link Of The Day—The Austin American Statesman says that Democrats have at least a decent shot of winning control of the Texas House of Representatives in 2010.

Blogger’s Note—Because I have some other projects I want to take on, I’ll be offering up shorter and more formulaic posts for the remainder of August. These posts will still be quite good and will merit your visiting the blog each day. Yet at the same time, shorter posts will allow me the time to accomplish other objectives. Thanks for reading Texas Liberal.

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August 18, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Many Presidents Have Died Early In Their Terms—President Palin

When a President has died in office, it has often been quite early in his term. This has often made a big difference in American history.

This is the Texas Liberal Election Fact of the Day.

The first President to die in office, William Henry Harrison, expired just a month into his term. Harrison died in 1841. President Harrison, at 68 the oldest President to that point, was a Whig. His Vice President, John Tyler, was a representative of the Southern planter class picked to help balance the ticket and not in full agreement with the Whig mainstream. As President, Tyler pursued policies, such a veto of a national bank, that greatly distressed Whig leaders such as Henry Clay.

President Zachary Taylor passed on in 1850 after serving just 17 months of his term. He was succeeded by Millard Filmore

Abe Lincoln’s (above)1865 assassination occurred just a month into his second term. His Vice President, Andrew Johnson (below), who had not been Lincoln’s first term VP, had very different views than Lincoln on Reconstruction, and how the South and Southerners should be handled after the Civil War.

Here is a stark difference between the person elected President and the person elected Vice President. The United States got one month of a great President and just under four years of a terrible President. And black folks got a century of Jim Crow.  

James Garfield was shot in the first year of his term in 1881. He died a few months later. Garfield’s successor, Chester Arthur, might well have been an improvement. President Arthur sought Civil Service reform and was surprisingly independeant despite a reputation as a machine politician.

William McKinley was shot and killed in the first year of his second term in 1901. McKinley’s Vice President, Theodore Roosevelt, who like Andrew Johnson had not been the first term VP, was a very different man than McKinley.

Franklin Roosevelt was shot at in 1933 in the time between his election and inauguration. Roosevelt’s Vice President-elect, John Nance Garner was far more conservative than F.D.R. You might never of had a New Deal if Garner had become President instead of Roosevelt.

Roosevelt would later die in the first weeks of his fourth term. Vice President Harry Truman who had not been VP in the first three F.D.R terms, took the White House and did a pretty good job.  

Also, Ronald Reagan was shot and seriously wounded in his first year as President in 1981.

Let’s say you are less than a hardcore Republican, yet are still considering voting for 72 year old John McCain. American history shows us that you may feel you’re voting for Mr. McCain, but that what you really may get is President Sarah Palin.

October 2, 2008 Posted by | Campaign 2008, Election Fact Of The Day, History, Political History, Politics | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments