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Charles De Gaulle’s Great Speech Of June 18,1940

File:De-gaulle-radio.jpg

June 18, 1940 is the day that General Charles De Gaulle made the speech on the BBC from London that began French resistance to Nazi occupation.

It was a great speech that is still recalled in France and in all places where the great events of World War II are remembered.

(Above–De Gaulle speaking on the BBC during World War II.)

De Gaulle left France in 1940 as an exile and came back four years later to lead France.

France and De Gaulle appeared to have been defeated in 1940. But they were not defeated.

A great two-volume of De Gaulle was written by Jean Lacouture. The first volume is called De Gaulle–The Rebel, 1890-1944Here is a review of that book. The second volume is De Gaulle–The Ruler, 1945-1970.

A good one-volume biography is The Last Great Frenchman–A Life of Charles De Gaulle by Charles Williams.

De Gaulle’s war memoirs are justly well-regarded.

(Below–Some of De Gaulle’s words in French. Photo by Semnoz.)

Here is some biographical information about Charles De Gaulle.

Here is a BBC biography of De Gaulle.

De Gaulle was neither a figure of the political left or right. His loyalty was to France and, sometimes, to the idea of putting on a grand performance on the world stage.  He was often serious and absurd at the same time

What could have been more absurd than the notion of one lone general banished to London after the Nazi overrun of France coming back within a few years as the political master of France?

Charles De Gaulle is a subject that merits your further study. In studying the life of De Gaulle you will learn about French history, World War II, European and Cold War politics of the 1950’s and 60’s, and the bloody battle for Algerian Independence.

You’ll also learn about fighting and winning a fight that seemed at first to be hopeless.

Here is the great speech I referenced above. It is also called the Appeal of June 18—

The leaders who, for many years, were at the head of French armies, have formed a government. This government, alleging our armies to be undone, agreed with the enemy to stop fighting. Of course, we were subdued by the mechanical, ground and air forces of the enemy. Infinitely more than their number, it was the tanks, the airplanes, the tactics of the Germans which made us retreat. It was the tanks, the airplanes, the tactics of the Germans that surprised our leaders to the point to bring them there where they are today.

But has the last word been said? Must hope disappear? Is defeat final? No!

Believe me, I speak to you with full knowledge of the facts and tell you that nothing is lost for France. The same means that overcame us can bring us to a day of victory. For France is not alone! She is not alone! She is not alone! She has a vast Empire behind her. She can align with the British Empire that holds the sea and continues the fight. She can, like England, use without limit the immense industry of United States.

This war is not limited to the unfortunate territory of our country. This war is not finished by the battle of France. This war is a world-wide war. All the faults, all the delays, all the suffering, do not prevent there to be, in the world, all the necessary means to one day crush our enemies. Vanquished today by mechanical force, we will be able to overcome in the future by a superior mechanical force.

The destiny of the world is here. I, General of Gaulle, currently in London, invite the officers and the French soldiers who are located in British territory or who would come there, with their weapons or without their weapons, I invite the engineers and the special workers of armament industries who are located in British territory or who would come there, to put themselves in contact with me.

Whatever happens, the flame of the French resistance not must not be extinguished and will not be extinguished. Tomorrow, as today, I will speak on Radio London.

June 18, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | 2 Comments

Happy Birthday Charles De Gaulle

Today is the birthday of Charles De Gaulle.

The video above is of President De Gaulle calling for Quebec separatism while at the Montreal City Hall in 1967.

Pure entertainment.

Charles De Gaulle lived 1890-1970.

De Gaulle was the great French hero of WW II and of Algeria.

Here is my post about General De Gaulle’s famous speech of June 18, 1940.  This speech began the French Resistance to German rule of France.

A great two-volume of De Gaulle was written by Jean Lacouture. The first volume is called De Gaulle–The Rebel, 1890-1944Here is a review of that book. The second volume is De Gaulle–The Ruler, 1945-1970.

A good one-volume biography is The Last Great Frenchman–A Life of Charles De Gaulle by Charles Williams.

De Gaulle’s war memoirs are justly well-regarded.

Here is biographical information about Charles De Gaulle.

Here is a BBC biography of De Gaulle.

Aware of his duties as a leader of the French resistance and as President of France, while at the same time never losing a sense of the absurd, Charles De Gaulle has long been one of my favorite figures of history.

November 22, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | 3 Comments

De Gaulle’s Famous Speech Of June 18, 1940

File:De-gaulle-radio.jpg

June 18, 1940 is the day that General Charles De Gaulle made the speech on the BBC from London that began French resistance to Nazi occupation. It is a great speech that is still recalled in France and in all places where the great events of World War II are remembered.

(Above–De Gaulle speaking on the BBC during World War II.)

De Gaulle left France in 1940 as an exile and came back four years later to lead France.

France and De Gaulle appeared to have been defeated in 1940. But they were not defeated.

A great two-volume of De Gaulle was written by Jean Lacouture. The first volume is called De Gaulle–The Rebel, 1890-1944Here is a review of that book. The second volume is De Gaulle–The Ruler, 1945-1970.

A good one-volume biography is The Last Great Frenchman–A Life of Charles De Gaulle by Charles Williams.

De Gaulle’s war memoirs are justly well-regarded.

(Below–The great speech in French. Photo by Semnoz.)

Here is some biographical information about Charles De Gaulle.

Here is a BBC biography of De Gaulle.

De Gaulle was neither a figure of the political left or right. His loyalty was to France and, sometimes, to the idea of putting on a grand performance on the world stage.  He was often serious and absurd at the same time

What could have been more absurd than the notion of one lone general banished to London after the Nazi overrun of France coming back within a few years as the political master of France?

Charles De Gaulle is a subject that merits your further study. In studying the life of De Gaulle you will learn about French history, World War II, European and Cold War politics of the 1950’s and 60’s, and the bloody battle for Algerian Independence.

You’ll also learn about fighting and winning a fight that seemed at first to be hopeless.

Here is the great speech I referenced above. It is also called the Appeal of June 18—

The leaders who, for many years, were at the head of French armies, have formed a government. This government, alleging our armies to be undone, agreed with the enemy to stop fighting. Of course, we were subdued by the mechanical, ground and air forces of the enemy. Infinitely more than their number, it was the tanks, the airplanes, the tactics of the Germans which made us retreat. It was the tanks, the airplanes, the tactics of the Germans that surprised our leaders to the point to bring them there where they are today.

But has the last word been said? Must hope disappear? Is defeat final? No!

Believe me, I speak to you with full knowledge of the facts and tell you that nothing is lost for France. The same means that overcame us can bring us to a day of victory. For France is not alone! She is not alone! She is not alone! She has a vast Empire behind her. She can align with the British Empire that holds the sea and continues the fight. She can, like England, use without limit the immense industry of United States.

This war is not limited to the unfortunate territory of our country. This war is not finished by the battle of France. This war is a world-wide war. All the faults, all the delays, all the suffering, do not prevent there to be, in the world, all the necessary means to one day crush our enemies. Vanquished today by mechanical force, we will be able to overcome in the future by a superior mechanical force.

The destiny of the world is here. I, General of Gaulle, currently in London, invite the officers and the French soldiers who are located in British territory or who would come there, with their weapons or without their weapons, I invite the engineers and the special workers of armament industries who are located in British territory or who would come there, to put themselves in contact with me.

Whatever happens, the flame of the French resistance not must not be extinguished and will not be extinguished. Tomorrow, as today, I will speak on Radio London.

June 17, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

De Gaulle’s Great Speech Of June 18, 1940—Learning About Charles De Gaulle

File:De-gaulle-radio.jpg

June 18, 1940 is the day that General Charles De Gaullemade the speech on the BBC from London that began French resistance to Nazi occupation. It is a great speech that is still recalled in France and in all places where the great events of World War II are remembered.

(Above–De Gaulle speaking on the BBC during World War II.)

De Gaulle left France in 1940 as an exile and came back four years later to lead France.

France and De Gaulle appeared to have been defeated in 1940, but they were not defeated.

A great two-volume of De Gaulle was written by Jean Lacouture. The first volume is called De Gaulle–The Rebel, 1890-1944Here is a review of that book. The second volume is De Gaulle–The Ruler, 1945-1970.

A good one-volume biography is The Last Great Frenchman–A Life of Charles De Gaulle by Charles Williams.

De Gaulle’s war memoirs are justly well-regarded.

(Below—De Gaulle on the cover of Life Magazine in 1958.)

Here is some biographical information about Charles De Gaulle.

Here is a BBC biography of De Gaulle.

De Gaulle was neither a figure of the political left or right. His loyalty was to France and, sometimes, to the idea of putting on a grand performance on the world stage.  He was often both serious and absurd at the same time

What could have been more absurd than the notion of one lone general banished to London after the Nazi overrun of France, coming back within a few years as the political master of France?

Charles De Gaulle is a subject that merits your further study. In studying the life of De Gaulle you will learn about French history, World War II, European and Cold War politics of the 1950’s and 60’s, and the bloody battle for Algerian Independence.

You’ll also learn about fighting and winning a fight that seemed at first, in the eyes of many at the time at least, hopeless.

Here is the great speech I referenced above. It is also called the Appeal of June 18—

The leaders who, for many years, were at the head of French armies, have formed a government. This government, alleging our armies to be undone, agreed with the enemy to stop fighting. Of course, we were subdued by the mechanical, ground and air forces of the enemy. Infinitely more than their number, it was the tanks, the airplanes, the tactics of the Germans which made us retreat. It was the tanks, the airplanes, the tactics of the Germans that surprised our leaders to the point to bring them there where they are today.

But has the last word been said? Must hope disappear? Is defeat final? No! Continue reading

June 16, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Houston Council Candidate Noel Freeman Reponds To This Blog

Blogger’s Note—Last week I made a post about Houston City Council Candidate Noel Freeman. Please click here to read that post. Mr. Freeman is running for at-large place #4. Here is his campaign web home.

Mr. Freeman has been kind enough to respond to the questions I asked in my post. He has even highlighted my questions in bold lettering. What I like most about Mr. Freeman’s reply is his very first line where he says “Thank you for the wonderful post about me.”  These are the words of a great statesperson. I’d liken the insight involved  with such words to De Gaulle’s decision to grant independence to Algeria. ( Above–De Gaulle)

At some point soon I will comment on what Mr. Freeman has had to say. At the moment though my in-laws are in town and we’re going to the art museum.  

Mr. Freeman’s reply—

Thank you for the wonderful post about me. I enjoyed meeting you, and wish I had been able to dedicate time to responding to your questions earlier. Be warned, my post is a long one.

I have worked for in the Public Works Department for nearly five years and have been dedicated to resolving problems and making our City work better for my fellow Houstonians. Simply put, I’m not running to just get elected to something; I’m running to make a difference in the way our City operates and to make a positive impact on the lives of others and to build a stronger future for our City.

Every candidate has their stump speech, sound bites and usual rhetoric, but many of them don’t have the extensive knowledge of how our City functions on a daily basis or the experience getting results across our City’s government that I do.

With that, I will get to your questions.

“What will he do to make the Democratic party in Houston more responsive to the needs and hopes of all Houstonians?”

Let me start by saying that I really do appreciate the officially non-partisan nature of our elections for City Council. There are so many issues that transcend political party affiliation, and I intend to be a strong representative of all Houstonians, not just Democrats.

However, I think that the Democratic Party here in Houston has struggled for a very long time with getting certain parts of its base out to vote. The demographics of those who vote do not reflect the demographics of the City as a whole. I want to work with the party to find new ways to engage communities with historically low voter turnout and get them engaged in the political process. We have to take ownership of our future, and the only way to do that is to be actively engaged in the process.

Continue reading

April 7, 2009 Posted by | Houston, Politics | , , , , | 1 Comment

Texas Nominating Caucus Requires Hat, Book & Loud Bell—I Hope Caucus Is Full Of Trouble

In half-an-hour I’ll leave to go the Texas Democratic caucus to help select delegates not allocated in the popular primary today. 

Here is more about this process

I’m not sure how the church I voted in this morning will have enough parking.

I’m going to wear a hat this evening such as we see here on General De Gaulle’s head.

It’s called a kepi.

If anyone asks me why I am wearing this hat I will tell them to get the hell away from me.

Will I also wear the uniform?

Yes.

I’ll also bring a book to the caucus. I figure it is going to go on for hours and I might need a distraction.

Here is the book I’ll be reading–

 

Book with words make my head hurt.

I’ve heard that some of the campaigns are encouraging supporters to be aggressive in gaining the tactical upper-hand at these caucuses. Along these lines, I am bringing this bell to get attention.

 

I hope the caucus is fun. I hope it is disorganized and contentious. Short of violence, I hope it is full of trouble and disagreement.

That’s democracy for you.

March 5, 2008 Posted by | Books, Campaign 2008, Houston, Politics, Texas, Texas Primary '08 | , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

What Heraclitus Said About The Inability To Step Into The Same River Twice

A famous  quotation from Ancient Greek philosophy, which I want to be clear I’m not an expert on, is from Heraclitus about the  impossibility of stepping into the same river twice.

This is that passage as reported by the ancient biographer Plutarch

“For it is not possible to step twice in to the same river, according to Heraclitus, nor to touch mortal substance twice in any condition: by the swiftness and speed of it’s change, it scatters and collects itself again—or rather, it is not again and later but simultaneously that comes together and departs, approaches and retires.”

I can’t find the quote in the two volumes, but in Jean Lacouture’s first rate biography of Charles De Gaulle, Lacouture writes that De Gaulle found Heraclitus’ idea of use in his practice of politics.

I find it useful as well. Things change and are the same. Things can be relative and exist within fixed boundaries at the same time.

The picture above is of the Hooghly River in India.

Below is a picture of a wadi in the Negev desert area of Israel. A wadi is a riverbed that only flows after a heavy rain. So sometimes you can step into a river that is no longer a river—Though it might become a river again.

December 16, 2007 Posted by | Books, Politics | , , , , , , , | 1 Comment