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What Is The Subconscious Mind?

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For many years I had a recurring dream that I was in the Brown University Bookstore on Thayer Street in Providence, Rhode Island. (Above you see a picture of the Brown University Bookstore I took last year. The store is the grey building on the left. To the right is Thayer Street.)

After some years of this dream, I began to think about this place during my waking hours. 

As long as the dream went on, I never figured out why I was having the dream.   

As a kid I often went to the Brown U. store.  Last summer, in Providence for the first time in 20 years, I went into the bookstore for first time since maybe 1980. I’ve not had the dream since I went into the store last year.

In the past couple of months, I’ve had a new recurring dream. I dream I’m in parts of Providence that I knew as a kid, but did not see when in Providence last summer. I’ve now had this new dream three times.

Though I lived in Providence for my first 13 years, I consider Cincinnati, Ohio  my hometown far more than Providence. Cincinnati is where I lived the 18 years after Providence. Yet its Providence I keep dreaming about.

I think this is in part because I visit Cincinnati twice a year and have only been to Providence once in the past 20 years. I think if I did not regularly see Cincinnati, I would dream of that city as well.

In any case, all this got me to thinking about the subconscious mind.  What is the subconscious mind? 

A New York Times article from 2007  says it is something that guides your actions more than you realize. It says our minds respond in ways we don’t fully control in response to clues and triggers. For example, if we see a briefcase we may become more competitive. 

Past that article, what I found by poking around on the internet—perhaps reflecting a subconscious view that I don’t really want to know what is lurking in my mind—was nothing very solid.

There is a lot of stuff about using your so-called subconscious mind to quit smoking or become rich. Other web pages had a New Age feel. New Age stuff is fine for people who go for all that–But it does not do so much for me.

Wikipedia has a definition. 

Beyond my wariness of what I read in Wikipedia—And I do appreciate Wikipedia for all the pictures I use on this blog that I get from that source—I find myself wondering how we can well-define something that takes place in our subconscious. How can anyone know for sure?

I’d like to think that right now in my subconcious mind some type of dinosaur fight is taking place—

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Here is the defintion of subconcious from The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary.

” Of or pertaining to, existing in, the part of the mind which influences actions etc. without one’s “full” awareness.”

I think this is as close as we are going to get to a good definition.

Your subconcious mind is present in some respect and it is messing with you in someway. If all it is doing is making you have a dream about a place you left a long time ago, you’re likely getting off lucky.

( Here is a link to information about Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal. Maybe those of who reached this post via a search engine question will have thoughts of all the good FDR and the New Deal accomplished planted in your subconscious when you are deciding in the future how to vote.)

May 11, 2009 Posted by | Books, Cincinnati | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

1569 Views A Day For 2009 And 600,000 Total—Thank You Blog Reading Public

For 2009, I set a goal of 1500 page views a day for Texas Liberal. In 2008, I had 912 a day.

(Above is a picture of the Ohio River I took from the Eden Park Overlook in Cincinnati two years ago. Cincinnati is my home away from home.)

So far for 2009, I’m averaging 1569 page views a day.

Also, yesterday Texas Liberal went over 600,000 total page views.

I’m also a featured politics reader-blogger at the Houston Chronicle.

Thanks to the blog reading public for the support and for your comments.

If you like this blog, please forward the link. A blog grows one reader at a time.

(Below–Galveston, Texas. Another home away from home.)

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May 4, 2009 Posted by | Blogging, Cincinnati, Galveston | , , , | 3 Comments

Cincinnati NAACP Hires Right-Wing Attorney With Poor Civil Rights Record—Can’t Black Folks And Gay Folks Get Along Better?

The Cincinnati NAACP has hired conservative lawyer Christopher Finney to serve as it’s Director of Legal Redress.

The Cincinnati NAACP has done this despite Mr. Finney’s record of opposing the rights of gay folks in Cincinnati.

(The links above are to my blogger friend at Queer Cincinnati.  Texas Liberal is always glad to be listed at that shop as a Queer Cincinnati blogger.) 

Mr. Finney had a large hand in the passage of the terrible Issue 3 in Cincinnati back in 1993. This measure denied legal protections to gay citizens of Cincinnati that were extended to all other Cincinnatians.( It has since been repealed.)

The rights all people are connected.

I’ve long had the frustration that some advocates of gay rights don’t look behind their own interests. They don’t always seem to see the link between their rights and the rights of all people. Sometimes they come of as elitist and looking for more of a kind economic empacipation rather than looking for the freedom of all people.

Yet what impression can be left with gay rights advocates and with all freedom-loving people in the Cincinnati area when  Christopher Finney is hired to work for the Cincinnati NAACP?     

Why can’t black folks and gay folks get along? When will leaders in the black community speak more forcefully about accepting all people as they were born? Black folks and most gay folks came together to vote for Mr. Obama last November.  Can’t this fact be used as a starting point for better relations between the two groups?  

Writing about this issue and seeing that Chris Finney is still causing trouble after I’ve been away from Cincinnati for 11 years reminds me of the Jean Sartre play No Exit. The same people year after year after year afflicting each other by dredging up bad memories and the inability to leave the room even though they may in fact have the option to go elsewhere.

It’s not really different anywhere else. Though in a big spread-out place like Houston, with a young and often transient population, fewer people make the pretense of caring.  I don’t advocate widespread apathy, though sometimes I see its virtues. 

March 23, 2009 Posted by | Books, Cincinnati, Houston, Politics | , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Pottery Is Gift For Ninth Wedding Anniversary

Time now for a ninth wedding anniversary blogging break.

How long will the break last?

Well—today is Saturday and I will post next on Monday.

You are on your own for Sunday.

What gift should I give the wife for our ninth anniversary?

It seems that the traditional gift is pottery.

(Here is a history of pottery.)

This Rookwood Pottery below would mark the fact that the wife and I met in Cincinnati. Rookwood Pottery was made in Cincinnati.

Or I could just go somewhere and buy all they have on display.

” One of everything please.”

Neolithic people gave pottery as a gift. I’m sure they did. Below you see what may have been a gift for a ninth wedding anniversary back in neolithic times. 

“Ooga booga–Here is gift of pottery.”

“uuguum… Thank you.  Now I conk you over head.”

Below is modern pottery of Japan. (Please click here to learn about pottery of Japan.)

On the pottery from Japan you see a fish. 

With my wife being Jewish, maybe if I gave her the pottery you see below from 4000 B.C. Iran it help bring peace and understanding in the world. At least it would until the National Museum of Tehran announced that a  Jewish woman in Texas had Iran’s 6000 year old pottery.  

(Here is information about pottery in Iran. It goes back 8000 years.)

I’m pretty sure my wife would enjoy a gift of these two giant pottery pieces from Safi, Morocco.

So did I get the wife any pottery for our ninth anniversary? I’m afraid I did not. I only learned that pottery was the right gift when I looked it up for this post.

That’s okay though. Surely being the wife of the best blogger in Texas is gift enough  for the wife.

Right?

March 21, 2009 Posted by | Art, Cincinnati, My Wife Is The Best Person Ever | , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Esme Kenney

I’m sorry to report the death of 13 year old Esme Kenney of Cincinnati, Ohio. Above is a picture of Esme.

Esme is the sister of my longtime friend Brian Kenney.

Here is a tribute to Esme from her brother.

Esme was taken and murdered while jogging in Cincinnati. A suspect has been arrested.

This is a link to Esme’s blog. She was a student at the School of Creative and Performing Arts in Cincinnati. I did not know her, but it seems she was a very bright and nice young person.  

I’m not sure what to say except that I hope Brian and his family find what peace is possible for them to find in the days and years ahead.

Esme’s family has asked that any donations in her memory be sent to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. 

March 9, 2009 Posted by | Cincinnati | , | 11 Comments

Brendan Halpin—Please Consider Reading His Fine Novels

Brendan Halpin is one of America’ s leading novelists. If you’ve not heard of him, where have you been?

Brendan’s most recent title, Forever Changes, is a compelling story.

This is how Brendan describes Forever Changes

“Forever Changes is a novel about life, death, math, and Love (the emotion and the band).  It’s the story of a high school senior with Cystic Fibrosis whose unlikely friendship with her calculus teacher, who claims to have been the guitarist for Love, helps her to come to terms with her own mortality.  But it’s not about dying–it’s about living with the knowledge that you’re going to die. Which is really everyone’s problem; it’s just that it’s a more immediate issue for some people than others. ” 

Brendan is, as I am, a native of Cincinnati, Ohio. You might think, based on this blog, that all anyone from Cincinnati can do is spend hours of his life working on a blog that does not earn a single penny. 

Wrong.

Brendan Halpin, one of America’s most beloved authors, has published seven books.  You can click here to visit Brendan’s blog and see all his titles.  You can poke around his blog and get a sense of his work. Brendan has written both adult and young adult titles. He’s also written non-fiction. It Takes A Worried Man is a well-reviewed account of Brendan’s late wife’s fight against breast cancer.

Give Brendan a shot. Though he has some success getting his work published, making a buck can, in fact, be a harder thing than getting published. The hours and thought that Brendan puts into his writing also have great value as man cannot live on bread alone. 

Brendan is currently a teacher in Boston.

February 23, 2009 Posted by | Books, Cincinnati | , , , | Leave a comment

The Bars That I Visited Most Often

What could be more important than the bars you hung out in when you were younger?

Not much.

There were three bars I spent the most time in when I lived in Cincinnati, Ohio. All my good bar days were in Cincinnati. I’ve lived in Houston for ten years and I don’t go to bars at all. In Cincinnati, I went all the time.

I enjoyed seeing my friends. And often I brought a book to read. Many places I went had a band playing and I rarely cared about the bands. I’m sure many of them were good. The local acts were often comprised of people I knew, and I’m sure they were good bands. It just never interested me. When the bands were playing and I could not talk to people, I would read my book.

There were three bars I visted most. One was a bar- laundry mat called Sudsy Malone’s. There were washers and dryers in the back of the house.  It was Short Vine street in Cincinnati. Below is a picture of Sudsy’s from the outside.  

And here is a picture from a show at Sudsy’s.

Now that’s entertainment!

Sudsy’s is now closed. The pictures came from a Sudsy’s Facebook group. 

Another bar I was a regular at was just down the street from Sudsy’s. It was, and still is, called Sub Galley. I can say in truth that I was for a time “Mayor” of this place. Below you see a picture of Chris the bartender. This picture is also from a Facebook group. 

I never could figure out the full story with Chris, but he was always a decent enough guy as far as I was concerned. Sub Galley was seen by some as a hangout for low lifes.  I think that view had some merit. 

The guy with the beard in the photo was Karl.

My last hangout was The Jockey Club in Newport, Kentucky. Newport is right across the Ohio River from Cincinnati. I’ve written about the Jockey Club before on the blog. It was the greatest punk rock club in all the world. The Jockey Club closed in 1988. The picture is from the club’s last night.

I like my life today and I miss my places from the past.

I hope you have some hangouts where you once spent your nights. It’s fun!…at least to some point in life it was fun.

February 12, 2009 Posted by | Books, Cincinnati, Music, Relationships | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

25 Things About This Blogger—With Paul Revere Painting

I’ve been tagged for one of these 25 things about me lists on Facebook. Vanity compels me to comply. I’ve not yet posted this on Facebook. It’s just that I need a blog post for today.

I like Facebook. It’s an easy way to keep in touch with folks.  If any of the blog reading public would like to add a friend who is also one of America’s leading bloggers…..well, I can’t help you.  But if you’d like to add me, my name in Neil Aquino and I live in Houston. Look me up and I’ll add you on. The more the merrier. 

Here we go—

1. Anything good about me, or good in my life, is in large part due to my wife. Anything bad is my doing.

2. I’ve had four clear-cut best friends at points in my life. One is my wife. One was a grade school kid I’ve long lost touch with. One is just beginning the study of Chinese medicine in Portland, Oregon. I still exchange e-mails with her on and off.  The final one is the only I can’t have a decent conversation with anymore. I’m appreciative of her friendship at one time in my life, but I don’t regret the inability to converse with her now.

3. Sometimes I wonder if I would be better off giving up the blog and writing a letter to a friend each day. I give a fair amount of thought about the best ways to communicate.

4. I work hard to maintain friendships across the years and across what are now often great distances. I’m mostly successful with this. Yet I have room to do better.

5. When we keep up with friends, I feel we provide our lives with a measure of permanence that offers a rebuttal to death. We are saying there is a source of stability in an existence marked by things moving away from each other. Longstanding relationships also give a greater relevance to the ways we’ve spent our time in life. When you have a friend for a long time, it’s evidence that you made a good decision many years ago. 

6. I feel you can define family in anyway you choose.

7.  I wish I had the ability to be an artist of some kind. I’d like to be able to  paint a picture. I’d paint a picture of people in a way that conveyed who they are. I’m lucky to have seen in person Copley’s painting of Paul Revere in Boston. Below you see that painting. It’s my favorite.  In this painting, Mr. Revere is both a worker and a thinker. 

 

8. I wish I had the time in life to be as creative as I feel I could be. I could gain a measure of that time by the better application of self-discipline.  

9. I feel that both the material events in our lives, as well as the thoughts that we think, all need context. Nothing exists alone. We need to know what came before and what may come after.

10. I think one can merge the public and private aspects of life in ways that give greater meaning to both. The two should not be divorced from one another.

11. I often wonder how one can combine a strong desire to be alone with a need to communicate. Hopefully, I’m able to do this in a way that is neither (fully) stand-offish or involves being around to much. (Though in truth, I’ve not yet figured this mix out.)

12. I have a good memory. I recall some things with such clarity that I feel the events I’m thinking about are taking place again.  This makes me wonder that if man is the measure of all things, than does not the abilty to retain and relive our memories challenge some of our concepts of time? The past is present in our thoughts and as a guide to our future actions.    

13. If each morning we could take just a few moments to assess our lives and our goals for the day, that would be an act of creation and imagination we could accomplish each day.

We could create time and time again. We could do so in a way that builds upon what came before, so that even an act of creation comes with context. I want to have the discipline to be able to do this.

14. I’m not convinced our leaders really believe most Americans have a viable economic future. At least in relation to how we have lived before. 

15. I’ve never spent a night outdoors and I never will unless forced to do so by a bad turn of events.

16. Just because your life is very good, does not mean it is entirely the life you want. Expressing this thought does not detract from the good things in your life. 

17. I’d like to live on an island.

18. I feel at home when with the wife, when at the ocean in Galveston, Texas, when writing, and when reading.  I also felt at home when I was at a bar called the  Jockey Club in Newport, Kentucky. That place has long been torn down.

19.  Much about the practice of politics bores me. I did not like most people I met when I worked in politics. Though the time I spent involved in politics was worth it.

20. I’m proud of the fact that my name has been on the ballot twice. Once as a candidate for Democratic precinct executive a Hamilton County, Ohio. I was the only candidate and won with about 15 votes cast in my little voting precinct.  That was, I think, in 1992. I got a certificate of election from the county. In 1997, I ran for the Cincinnati Board of Education and won about 10,000 votes.  I finished 9th of 12 with the top four being elected. I was endorsed by Stonewall Cincinnati and by a number of unions. Beyond being glad I had not finished last, I felt that I had done well in the voting.

 21. The best non-fiction book I’ve read is S.E. Finer’s three volume history of government. The best novel I’ve read is The Remains Of The Day by Kazuo Ishiguro.  

22. I’d like to start volunteering somewhere. I have a place in mind.

23. I’m lucky.

24. I think we can balance a strong and autonomous personality, with the need for collective action in our political lives. What could be better than free citizens making the willing choice to work for common ends?

 25. I’ll end where I started—Anything good about me, or good in my life, is in large part due to my wife. Anything bad is my doing

January 31, 2009 Posted by | Art, Blogging, Books, Cincinnati, Galveston, Houston, My Wife Is The Best Person Ever, Politics, Relationships | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

People Who Owned Mean Rotten Dog Now Won’t Take Down John McCain Sign

Not far from a home I lived in for many years in Cincinnati, was a house where was kept a horrible mean dog. Every time I would walk past that house, this big terrible dog, which was kept tied up outside, would bark and lunge at me.

I hated that dog and I despised the people who keep such a dog that scared people who were just passing by.

In my most recent visit to Cincinnati, which ended yesterday, this same house had in its lawn a John McCain sign. They have this sign up even though the election was over three weeks ago.

It’s been a few years now, but I’ll bet you the same rotten people live in that house.

I’m glad that dog is dead now. And while I don’t wish harm to come on the people who live in that house, I will say they are the same miserable rotten folks they were a decade ago.

November 29, 2008 Posted by | Cincinnati | , | 10 Comments

Global Financial Panic Be Damned—I’m Big Time

Cutting back due to the global financial panic makes you a sucker. Take it from me, a player, you can live big time all the time.

Just last night I had a $16 glass of scotch and took a $10 spin of a roulette wheel.

Here in Cincinnati, on my Thanksgiving blogging break, I was with my friend, who I’ll call “Kate” (That is her real name.), and we took a ride.

First, we went to the famous Palm Court room in the Downtown Hilton. (Photo above.)

I decided I’d like to order the second glass of scotch I’ve ever had. The waiter made a suggestion I followed ( I’m clever that way.) When we got the check, we saw I had enjoyed a $15.75 glass of scotch.  Just think how much it would have been if they had charged me for all the ice in that glass. The scotch was a 12 year old Macallans. (If that’s lousy stuff ,please don’t tell me.)

I’ve never had a $15.75 glass of anything. However, having nothing to fear but fear itself, I had this luxury last night even as the world collapses around us.

It’s all okay. My father had gave me $20 right before I went out last night. Just because you’re 41 doesn’t mean you can’t take a handout from your father. A player never passes up the big score.

Next up Kate and I got in my rented Ford Focus–I may own a Japanese car but I pledge to always rent American–and we drove on down River Road.

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I had planned to take Kate to see (photo aboveWilliam Henry Harrison’s tomb. ( A player knows American history like the back of his or her hand.) But it was dark and I guess I drove past it. Before we knew it we had crossed over into Indiana. (Your best friends are the people who will follow you to even William Henry Harrison’s tomb at 10:30 PM on a 35 degree night. If you have a friend like that, be sure to treat them well.)

Lawrenceburg, Indiana (photo below) , just over the Ohio-Indiana line, has a casino. It’s on a so-called boat that goes nowhere. The boat is on the Ohio River. I thought maybe I could go to the casino and win back my dad’s $20. Having spent the money on scotch the first time, I thought I could win the cash back and possibly take up smoking with it the second time around.

Lawrenceburg from the air, looking northeast

I told Kate I wanted to go in and try the roulette wheel. We went in and saw that the wheel cost a minimum of $10 to play. (You can tell my wife I was with Kate, but please don’t tell her about the $10 roulette wheel.)

I made my $10 bet on the number 22. The number 2 was the winner. A player knows when to quit. Kate and I left.

On the way back, Kate and I talked about just how many people were at that casino at 11 PM on a Tuesday night. The casino was, as casinos can be, depressing. 

No matter. A player doesn’t let other people’s troubles get him down. I’m going to hit up dad for the $10 I lost on the roulette wheel and go buy some lottery tickets.

November 26, 2008 Posted by | Cincinnati | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Houston-Cincinnati Flight Lacks First Class Section—Am I Going Nowhere?

The Houston-Cincinnati flight that I take twice a year has no first class section. Does this mean the airline views all passengers on this flight as second class? Am I a low rent person who should be denied even the chance for an upgrade?

(Above is a first class suite on an Emirates Airline Boeing 777-200LR. Looks nice.)

The easiest explanation for the absence of a first class is that the jet that flies between Houston and Cincinnati has something like 55 seats, and is not large enough for a first class section. This brings up other questions. Am I going places in life others avoid? Am I headed nowhere?

It could be that for a plane flying over our so-called “heartland”, it would seen as out of character to make a class distinction between passengers.  As we fly along and over the Mississippi River and the Ohio River, we are all just so many Huck Finns (Below–Huck Finn) on a lazy raft up and down the river.

 

Most likely though, the view is that only a lower class of citizens would be flying to these places and  my status as a semi-regular on this flight helps confirms this fact. 

Lacking an incentive to better myself, since no first class is even available, I seem certain to have no better fate in life but to be a blogger for all the rest of my days.   

As I sit on the Houston-Cincinnati flight later this week, I’ll reflect on what has gone wrong. If only I had booked a ticket to a first class destination, everything in my life would be different.    

(On my way to Cincinnati I’ll be flying over the Louisville, KY home of the fine blogger who writes Ohio River, Left Bank, MP 606.)

(Here is my review of my last Houston-Cincinnati flight. It was quite an adeventure.)

(The Houston-Cincinnati flight will be aboard an Embraer ERJ 145 such as seen below.)  

November 20, 2008 Posted by | Cincinnati, Houston | , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Weekly Poker Game—Politeness At The Table & Women Were Allowed To Play

I recently e-mailed some friends in Cincinnati to say I’d be visiting soon and that we should play poker. Years ago we would play every Sunday night. It’s hard to imagine now that we had the time for a weekly game. But we played regularly for at least a couple of years.

( Above are the poker chips used by Harry Truman while he was President.) 

Now, ten years after I left Cincinnati, the game is played once or twice a year when I’m in town.

We played our weekly game before poker became a big deal on ESPN. I’m 99% certain none of our regular players could name a big time pro poker star.

Bets larger than a few dollars were frowned upon. Rude behavior at the table was not allowed. And women were always allowed to play. I promise that the words “Texas hold’em” were never used. I can’t imagine the word Texas itself was ever used except to make fun of the place.

I miss our weekly poker games. I hope we are able to get one together soon.     

Here is a history of poker.

November 12, 2008 Posted by | Cincinnati, Texas | , , , | 3 Comments

Texas Liberal Election Predictions

Here are my Texas Liberal election predictions. Please take them to the bank. They are certain to be correct.

President— Senator Obama will win 52.0% of the vote. Senator McCain will win 46.8%. 1.2% will go third party candidates. I don’t know what the final electoral vote count will be, but Mr. Obama will have at least the 270 needed for victory. That’s good enough.

Once in the voting booth, some of our fellow Americans, though not enough to shift the outcome, will have “second thoughts” about Mr. Obama. The motivation will in part be racial, but the larger factor will just be how fully different an Obama Presidency will be from we have known in recent years. Even a bad situation, if familiar, can be comforting. 

The racists have already made up their minds against Mr. Obama. But the good thing is that some racists will vote for Senator Obama and some of these people will see the world in a new way after Mr. Obama is President.

We all have room to grow. 

What will carry the the day for Mr. Obama will be increased turnout of black voters and young people. I don’t feel polls have captured these voters well. There are so many black folks who have just sat elections out over the years.

With the election of Mr. Obama we will be, for the time being at least, emancipated from the post 9/11 era of fear based politics. America’s political majority will be a multi-racial coalition of people who have hope for a decent future. 

That’s the side that I want to be on!

United States Senate—I predict 58 Democrats and 42 Republicans. Then 57 Democrats after Election Day when we do what is right and kick Joe Lieberman out of the Democratic caucus. This would be an overall gain of 7. 

I sure hope that Al Franken beats Norm Coleman in Minnesota. The Idea of Mr. Coleman sitting in Paul Wellstone’s seat just makes me sick.

United States House—I see a Democratic gain of 24 for a 257-178 Democratic Majority.

Here in Houston, Nick Lampson and Michael Skelly will lose their House races. Local Democrats will say how sad that all is, but in fact many Democrats will bid both men a hearty good riddance. Mr. Skelly’s campaign in particular has exceeded what is needed to win a Republican district. Is it really so that liberals are unlikely to be successful business people? As for Mr. Lampson, he got his two extra years in Congress and now he can pay his karmic debt for his terrible 2006 campaign. 

In my other hometown of Cincinnati, my parents will still be afflicted with Mean Jean Schmidt as their Congressperson, However, across town, increased black turnout is going to finally, after all these years, nail Steve Chabot. I don’t feel that my parents should move across town to live in the Democratic district. Maybe they could just drive over there every so often. 

Texas—Democrats will win back the Texas House, but fail to have a working majority because they refuse to move Texas into the 20th-century with a party-based majority system. Freelance House Democrats will hold out on the vote for Speaker to see who offers the best deal. Some will support a Republican for Speaker. The public will lose out and I’ll say I told you so.

Harris County, Texas—Democrats will win all offices but for County Judge Executive. They will win back the judgeships.  

The first thing I’ll be looking for is major reforms of how we conduct the death penalty in Harris County. Hopefully, the new District Attorney will pursue a course far less bloodthirsty and barbaric from what we have seen from the seemingly inhuman men who have been elected to this office in the ten years I’ve lived in Houston.

It will be up to rank-and-file Democrats and all people of Harris County to see that the new Democrats in Harris County office really represent a change. There is more to our county than traffic and hurricanes. There are many people who need help from government.

Urban voters are used by Democrats all the time. The switch to Democrats in Harris County reflects demographic trends, high turnout for Mr. Obama, and campaign money that flowed on in from big donors when it seemed likely Democrats could win the county. It is not some grassroots rebellion.

They’ll use us if we let them. Let us remain vigilant and make life better in our county.   

For those opposed to my views this Election Day, I offer nothing but the back of my hand. For those on my side of the aisle, let’s hope that this time the wheel lands on our number.

November 2, 2008 Posted by | Campaign 2008, Cincinnati, Houston, Politics, Texas | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

I’m Glad To Be A Cincinnati Queer Blogger

I’m very glad to be a Cincinnati Queer Blogger.  If you go to QueerCincinnati.com and look on the right side blogroll, you’ll see that Texas Liberal has an honored place as a Cincinnati Queer Blogger.

( Here is my post about attending a half gay wedding in Cincinnati. Isn’t it disgusting that we put of the matter of gay people getting married on the ballot? How would you like to have your most basic rights voted on?  Do you think all rights for Muslims would pass if they were placed on the ballot? People have essential freedoms that need to be protected. We have a right to the relationships we want in this brief and brutal life.) 

It’s great to have this connection to my longtime hometown and to this fine blog. As I never tire of telling folks, I was a Stonewall Cincinnati endorsed candidate for the Cincinnati Board of Education in 1997.

Thank you QueerCincinnati.

( Above is a snowy day in Cincinnati. In the center left is the corner of Martin Luther King & Eden. I lived on that corner for a couple of years. The smoke stack is from a power plant used by the nearby University of Cincinnati. How could I have known when I was on that corner in my college years that I’d someday be living in the semi-tropics of Houston and dealing with hurricanes?)  

I’d also like to thank my friend Teddy at Left Of College Stationfor the number of times he has linked to me in recent weeks. Teddy keeps on figthing despite being in an epicenter of the right in College Station, Texas.

Patti at Texas Education sent me a nice e-mail a few weeks back and I have been very slow to respond. I apologize for this transgression. Patti does a great job and I promise I’ve not forgotten her.

Perry at Brains & Eggs, written here in Houston, often gives me a link. Perry is a senior statesman among Texas political bloggers and a link from him is a strong endorsement that you’re doing a good job.

It’s been nice to have comments here from Tiffany who has just begun a blog of her own called What You Got Tired Of Reading On MySpace. I hope she sticks with the blogging and I’ll add her to my blogroll this week.

Jobsanger in Amarillo always does good work. Please read his blog often.

Finally, let me say hello to my friend Lunchcountersitin at All Other Persons out of Washington, D.C. The October 24 post on All Other Persons about the need of the National Urban League to get more with the times in its advocacy is on target. Many times I’ve walked past the Urban League building in Houston and wondered just what it is those folks are doing.

It is great to have so many blogger friends.

October 25, 2008 Posted by | Blogging, Cincinnati, Good People, Houston, Politics, Texas | , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Aurore Press To Release Jockey Club Book—Old Punk Rockers To Have Reunion Concert

 

Cincinnati’s Aurore Press will soon be releasing Stories For Shorty: A Collection Of Recollections From The Jockey Club 1982-1988. 

If you were lucky, you spent some time at Newport, Kentucky’s Jockey Club in the years mentioned above. 

The picture above from inside the Jockey Club above captures the essence of the place well.

Stories From Shorty will feature remembrances from Jockey Club patrons and performers. I think the book will be the publishing sensation of the fall.

Also, a Jockey Club reunion concert will be held Saturday night November 22 at Newport’s Southgate House. The doors open at 8. November 22 is the day of the release of the Jockey Club book.

Local giants such as The Thangs, SS-20, The Reduced and BPA will be just part of the musical lineup for the reunion show.  

Stories For Shorty will be released earlier in the day on November 22 at Shake It Records in Cincinnati. This event will take place at 5 PM at Shake It.      

I’m glad to report that I’ll be at the Southgate House for the show. I hope to see you there.

( Please click here for my greatest punk rock moments.)

October 12, 2008 Posted by | Books, Cincinnati, Music | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment