Texas Liberal

All People Matter

Should I Switch To An iPhone Or A Palm Pre?

File:Ammersee 29.01.2006.jpg

Should I buy an iPhone or a new Palm Pre phone?

When leaving home I take with me, as a general matter, my very basic cell phone, a few pens, a small notebook in my back pocket and something to read.

If I go to lunch by myself on a day off from work, or when at lunch at work, I use the time to read my book or magazine and mark down anything I wish to recall in my notebook. I use my cell phone to call and check in my wife.

I don’t reject technology. I make calls on my cell. I use a Flip Camera to make videos for this blog. And, as you might guess, I use a computer to write this blog. I don’t have a laptop. I write the blog from my personal computer at home.

I gave some though to if I should switch my phone to one of these new-fangled phones. I came to the view that it would not work for me. As represented by the picture above, I’m fragmented enough.       

I don’t need to check the internet when away from home. I don’t need a phone full of applications to further distract my attentions. I don’t have time enough to read the books and magazines I already own.

Fragmentation in contrast to a more cohesive whole is not a good thing. Look at the fragmented ice in the picture. How could one walk across that ice to get from one place to another? You’d just fall into that cold water and freeze and drown.  

It’s not just the fragments in the picture that are telling—It’s the setting sun as well. If our time is so divided, how can we get something of substance accomplished before it is dark?

I might get a rebate from the so-called service provider—my cell phone company is Sprint and they provide lousy service for the most part— when I buy one of these phones, but how will I get a rebate on the hours of my life?

Excessive fragmentation is bad in our lives. It is also bad for the rain forest.

New Scientist Magazine reports that Brazil’s Atlantic Rainforst is being destroyed in large chunks that are leaving only small fragments left for trees, flowers and animals to survive.

From the article—

THE ongoing degradation of the Amazon rainforest has obscured the plight of its smaller sibling: the Atlantic forest in Brazil, which is a biodiversity hotspot. Once covering about 1.5 million square kilometres, the rainforest has been reduced to about one-tenth of its original area in the past 500 years, a new study has shown….of the remaining forest, about 80 per cent is split into fragments of less than 0.5 square kilometres. The average distance between these fragments is 1.4 kilometres, making it difficult for animals to move from one part of the forest to another.

Here are some facts about the Atlantic Forest.

Below is a painting by a Johann Moritz Rugendas of the cutting down of trees in the Atlantic Forest. This painting was completed sometime between 1820 and 1825. You see that the darker skinned people are working and the lighter skinned people are either sitting down or up on a horse.

File:Rugendas - Defrichement d une Foret.jpg

June 9, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments