Texas Liberal

All People Matter

Where I Fit In

 

(Blogger’s note—This is a post I ran in 2007. I’m giving it another go today.) 

Below is where and when in life that I’ve felt at ease and like I was fitting in with the world around me.

You’ll have your own list of where you fit in. Everybody has a place where they feel they are meant to be.

My list—

1. When I’m alone.

2. When I’m with my wife.

3. When I’m alone in a crowd. Such as sitting by myself at a restaurant reading a book or taking a walk along the ocean in Galveston.

4. When I’m reading. A good book to read is Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson.   

5. When I used to go to the racetrack. A racetrack is a place of such apathy that it would be hard not to fit in. I would go to River Downs in Cincinnati. I don’t go to Sam Houston in Houston. 

6. When I’m riding some form of mass transportation. A bus or an airplane. I’m just one of the people leaving one place and headed to some other place. I like airports.

When I was in college, I took a number of long Greyhound Bus trips to see friends. Cincinnati to Reno was my longest trip. That was a long ride, but it was fun. I remember I was reading a history of Hawaii on that ride. I can’t recall the specific title.

The bus in the picture says it is going to Atlantic City. I got off a Greyhound bus once in Atlantic City and some people were having a fist fight in the bus station.

Though honestly, I’m not sure I could ride the Greyhound Bus anymore.

7.  At the punk rock club. Those days are past as well.

8. When I’m talking to a waitress or a clerk at a store and no more is expected from me than courtesy. I’m good at courtesy.

9.  When I’m with the few people in life I’ve come to know well enough and like enough to feel at ease with. It happens with different people for different reasons.

That about covers it.

Where ever you fit in, it’s okay. The person you are is (most likely at least) okay.

January 7, 2009 Posted by | Books, Relationships | , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How Tuna Is “Farmed”

The following is from a series of articles about the oceans prepared by The Economist magazine 

“Perhaps the most grotesque form of fish farming is the ranching of bluefin tuna, a delicacy that may sell for as much as $860 a kilo. Bluefins are sensitive creatures that hate being cooped up so much that, if confined, they tend to throw themselves against their cages and break their necks. Australian “ranchers” have now adopted a technique that involves catching young bluefins, enveloping them in a huge net and dragging it slowly round the south seas for months while feeding them pilchards imported from west Africa.”

I eat tuna and I don’t ask many questions about how it reaches my plate. But is this how we want to proceed? We’ve overfished the seas and now this is how we are getting our fish to eat. How can this be sustainable? We’re seeing in our economy what happens when we proceed in a way that is not sustainable. How many times do we need to learn (or not learn) the same lessons?     

Here is information about the Atlantic Bluefin Tuna. (above)

Here is information about various types of seafood and to what extent they are overfished.

Here is information about overfishing in the United States from Mother Jones magazine.

January 7, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment