Texas Liberal

All People Matter

How Can A Politician “Listen” to His Or Her Constituents?

It is difficult for politicians to really ” listen” to their constituents.

Many constituents don’t vote, have conflicting views and are self-centered.

The best any elected official can try to do is balance the general consensus, to the extent it can be determined, with the public interest and, also, his or her own beliefs.

March 22, 2008 Posted by | Politics | , | Leave a comment

Three Black Governors Since Reconstruction—Who Have They Been?

(Blogger’s Note 3/7/12—Four years fater this post was written, there have still been only three black post-reconstruction governors. Mr. Paterson is no longer Governor of New York. He did not run for reelection in 2010. Also, Mr. Wilder is no longer Mayor of Richmond. Governor Patrick won reelection as Governor of Massachusetts in 2010. Maybe somebody reading this post can be the next black governor, or will work hard to elect such a person.)

Newly inaugurated New York Governor David Paterson is America’s third black post-reconstruction governor.

Who are the other two black governors in American history and who is Mr. Paterson?

( Please click here for a post on black U.S. Senators and reasons why there have been so few black Senators.)

Click here for information about black statewide officeholders in the United States.

It was only relatively recently that any U.S. State elected a black governor.

It is often difficult to elect a black to statewide office.

Douglas Wilder was elected Governor of Virginia in 1989 and served the one term a Virginia Governor is permitted.

(Below–Douglas Wilder)

Here is what it is says about Douglas Wilder and Virginia in the 2008 Almanac of American Politics

In the 1980s, three moderate Democrats were elected governor–Charles Robb in 1981, Gerald Baliles in 1985, Douglas Wilder in 1989–because they no longer represented an attempt to impose a labor-liberal agenda on an unwilling Virginia, and because they argued they could use government effectively to improve education and build Virginia’s economy. Wilder’s election was a national breakthrough, a successful attempt by a black politician to campaign and govern on equal terms. His fiscal conservatism, which resulted in sharp spending cuts in the early 1990s, like his elegant manners and thick Richmond accent, echoes Virginia’s elitist and libertarian tradition; his insistence on the rule of law helped him win election as Richmond’s mayor in 2004.

You can make of that what you will.

The following description of Mr. Wilder is from the Virginia Historical Society

Lawrence Douglas Wilder was born on January 17, 1931, in Richmond, Virginia. The grandson of slaves, he was named after abolitionist-orator Frederick Douglass and poet Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Wilder attended Richmond’s racially segregated public schools—George Mason Elementary and Armstrong High School. In 1951, he graduated from Virginia Union University with a degree in chemistry. He served in the army during the Korean War, during which he won the Bronze Star for heroism in combat. After the war, Wilder returned to Richmond and worked as a chemist in the state medical examiner’s office. Using the benefits provided under the G.I. Bill of Rights, he studied law at Howard University in Washington, D.C. He received his degree in 1959 and after passing the bar in Virginia established his own law firm, Wilder, Gregory, and Associates.

In 1969, Wilder entered politics, running in a special election for the Virginia state senate. He won and became the first African American state senator in Virginia since Reconstruction. Wilder spent ten years in the General Assembly and was recognized as one of its most effective legislators.

Mr. Wilder is the current Mayor of Richmond, Virgina. Here is his homepage as Mayor.

In Massachusetts, Deval Patrick was elected in 2006 as the second black Governor.

Here is information about Governor Patrick from the Almanac.

“Patrick grew up in a tough South Side Chicago neighborhood, and lived in an apartment where he shared a single room with his mother and sister; his father left the family when he was a child. As early as grade school he showed tremendous promise and a teacher recommended him to A Better Chance, an organization that identifies and sends gifted minority students to college preparatory schools. Patrick received a scholarship and was sent far from home to the tony Milton Academy in Massachusetts. “[It] was like coming to a different planet,” Patrick would later say. He attended Harvard College and after graduating spent a year working in Africa on a United Nations project in the Darfur region of Sudan. When he returned, he enrolled at Harvard Law School and then clerked for a federal appeals court judge in Los Angeles. In 1983, he joined the NAACP Legal Defense Fund in New York and in 1986 Patrick went into private law practice; in 1994, he was appointed as the Justice Department’s Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights by President Bill Clinton. After three years in that post, Patrick returned to private practice in 1997 and later served as general counsel for Texaco and Coca-Cola…. Patrick was a long-shot in his first-ever run for elected office but his grassroots campaign quickly built support among liberal activists who liked his outsider message and his criticism of the state’s “backroom” political culture. He won the state party endorsement at its June 2006 convention, and after holding a steady lead in the polls throughout the summer, won the nomination decisively in the September 19 primary….Republican nominee was Lieutenant Governor Kerry Healey, who sought to become the state’s first female governor….Patrick pointed to his credentials as a Justice Department prosecutor and highlighted his executive-level experience at two Fortune 500 companies as evidence of his business-friendly background. Late in the campaign, Patrick was put on the defensive when Healey’s campaign ran tough ads criticizing him for his advocacy on behalf of convicted rapist Benjamin LaGuer. Patrick declined to respond with an aggressive counterattack, insisting that his success so far was the result of avoiding such conventional political tactics. His instincts proved correct: the ensuing publicity surrounding the negative ads—which featured a woman walking alone in a parking garage—muted the charges that Patrick would weaken criminal justice laws. He won a sweeping 56%-35% victory….In office, Patrick set about unraveling ( former Governor Mitt) Romney’s initiatives. He restored $383.6 million in budget cuts made by Romney, rescinded an agreement with the federal government that empowered the state police to arrest illegal immigrants, and put the brakes on a Romney administration plan to revamp the state’s automobile insurance system. He refused to sign a proclamation commemorating February 6, the late president’s birthday, as “Ronald Reagan Day.” But Patrick’s honeymoon period ended quickly as a series of missteps tarnished his image. Lavish spending on his official state car, helicopter travel, a renovation of the governor’s office that included $12,000 drapes and the hiring of a chief of staff for his wife led to weeks of bad press and harsh criticism. In March, Patrick acknowledged making a telephone call to Robert Rubin of Citigroup, which has significant business interests in the state, on behalf of the controversial mortgage lender Ameriquest; Patrick had served on Ameriquest’s parent company’s board of directors as recently as 2006. “   

Here is the website for Governor Patrick

Governor David Paterson of New York State has been in office for just a short time since taking over for the disgraced Eliot Spitzer.

Here is a photo essay on Mr. Paterson’s life. 

Here are a variety of facts and links to learn more about Mr. Paterson.  

(Below–David Paterson. Photo by MMR Dad)

Here is some information about Mr. Paterson from the New York Times–

David A. Paterson was elected lieutenant governor of New York in November 2006, a position with no power and little prestige, then propelled into the governorship by Eliot Spitzer’s shocking fall from power after the revelation of his involvement with a prostitution ring. Taking office on March 17, 2008, Mr. Paterson became New York’s first African-American governor, and the first legally blind person to serve as the governor of any state….As the leader of the Democratic minority in the Senate, Mr. Paterson tried to make up for his lack of power with wit, flurries of reform proposals and unusual bursts of candor, a combination that has made him a quotable presence in a Capitol where such leaders are often ignored as irrelevant….Mr. Paterson was born to politics. His father, Basil, represented the same Harlem district that his son later did, and ran unsuccessfully for lieutenant governor in 1970. The younger Mr. Paterson was raised at the knees of much of Harlem’s old guard. He also grew up legally blind, after an infection as an infant that left him totally without sight in his left eye and with severely limited sight in his right. His family moved to Long Island, where they found a school that agreed to educate him in regular classrooms. He graduated from high school in three years, went to college at Columbia and graduated from Hofstra Law School.

Here is a longer New York Times story reviewing Mr. Paterson’s career.

March 21, 2008 Posted by | Political History, Politics | , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Superdelegates Have Option To Deny Either Candidate A Majority

Superdelegates have a third option at the Democratic National Convention this summer.

Assuming that neither Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama wins a majority during the campaign, superdelegates can deny either candidate a majority.

As we’ve heard many times, superdelegates can vote for anybody they choose.

They could rally around one person, vote for themselves or their husbands or whoever, or they can vote for some type of placeholder person and let the process take its course. 

If when we get to the convention neither candidate seems electable, there is nothing that prohibits the convention from voting until a winner is found.

The roll of the states can be called as many times as need be.

Sooner or later some candidate, and it does not have to be Senator Clinton or Senator Obama, would emerge and win a majority of delegates. 

We’re not to this point yet, and I hope we don’t get there, but it is an option.

Here is a history of the superdelegate.

March 21, 2008 Posted by | Campaign 2008, Politics | , , , , | 4 Comments

$800K For Streetcar Study In Cincinnati—More Warped Priorities At The Expense Of Average People

Cincinnati City Council has allocated $800,000 for the study of streetcar routes in Cincinnati.

This despite failing schools and failing neighborhoods.

You the blog reader know this racket from what I’ve already told you.

Street cars will revitalize the city and make Cincinnati a fun place to visit!

( Above you see that while Cincinnati is considering streetcars, it is falling behind Tokyo in bullet trains.)

The gains from installing street cars will trickle down from Downtown and the inner-core to the entire city!

We need street cars just as we needed taxpayer subsidized department stores Downtown, and taxpayer subsidized stadiums!    

Sure.

These street cars are proposed to run only Downtown and in a very small number of areas close to Downtown. 

You can bet property owners along possible streetcar lines are excited.

When you oppose these types of projects you’re told you lack vision. 

Yet so often the so-called civic boosters and rah-rah types who advocate this nonsense, urge pragmatism and restraint when it comes to addressing the needs of the poor.       

It is hard not to be angry at the city councilmembers who enable this stuff at the request of their corporate donors and owners.

It is a difficult and life-long lesson to direct your efforts at the right people 

You have to realize it is structural and that in most cases when you get rid of one bad councilmember, he or she is replaced by another one responsive to the same interests. 

These priorities are set by people who have little contact with the day-to-day facts, for both good and ill, of living in Cincinnati.

This kind of thing goes on in cities across the nation.

But you can’t give up.  

Citizens must establish the civic priorities by voting, remaining informed and speaking out.

Citizens must be able to imagine a better and more just future than that offered by the same people who have brought the urban decline of recent years.

Otherwise, what you get are underused streetcar routes to Nero-like stadiums while neighborhoods decline and clear out.     

March 20, 2008 Posted by | Cincinnati, Lousy People, Politics | , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Why I Liked Senator Obama’s Speech On Race

Here are the reasons I liked Senator Barack Obama’s recent speech on race—

1. By correctly refusing to disown Pastor Jeremiah Wright, Mr. Obama showed loyalty.  

2. By speaking at length about the good points and bad points of the black church, Mr. Obama acknowledged the basic humanity and complexity of the average person.

3. By addressing the historical experience of both blacks and whites in the United States, Senator Obama asked us to consider context. This is something increasingly rare in our fragmented quick-paced society. Yet context is a starting point of seeing the lives of others in a humane and caring way.

4. By speaking in a reasonably forthright manner about a difficult subject, Mr. Obama respected the intelligence of the average voter.    

5. By offering the opportunity to move past divisive racial concerns in the 2008 Election, Senator Obama offered voters a positive choice.   

Here is a good USA Today story on the speech.—(No, you don’t need to read the 11,821 comments so far made about the story.) 

Here is the complete transcript of the speech.

Here is the Obama campaign web page.  

March 20, 2008 Posted by | Campaign 2008, History, Politics | , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Basic Questions Of Democracy From Sand Dunes Of North Padre Island

 

I recently read an article in the North Padre Island Moon about a new political action committee called Island United. North Padre Island is part of Corpus Christi, Texas.  

A purpose of this PAC is to encourage island residents to vote as a block in order to influence the outcome of elections for the Corpus Christi City Council and Mayor of Corpus Christi.

(Above is a Padre Island sand dune though I’m not sure how you’d prove otherwise if I’m making its location up. Here is information on sand dunes.)  

Some N. Padre Island residents feel a divided vote from the Island weakens the clout of the community at Corpus Christi City Hall.   

Here is the full article.

Please click here for a political map of Corpus Christi. 

The presumption of this PAC is that highly localized issues should be the guiding factor in how residents of this area cast votes for city council and mayor.  

Given the existing reality that Island voters have a history of differing opinions on who should be elected to municipal posts in Corpus Christi, this seems to be a tenuous assertion.    

What are factors beyond North Padre Island issues that could impact how people there vote for council and mayor?

1. How will candidates for city office administer Corpus Christi as a whole? Just as no man is an island, we can also say that not even an island is an island.

2. While I’m going to guess these council elections are officially non-partisan, voters likely have some sense of the state and national party affiliations of the candidates. Party matters at all levels of politics.

3. Voters may have competing loyalties. Endorsements from local unions or police groups or gay groups may count as much or more to some than where exactly in the city they live.          

4. The race, ethnicity, religious preferences, or gender of candidates may be a positive or a negative to some voters.

5. Especially in the one district-level council seat described in the article, some voters may know the candidates. They may like or dislike the candidates on a purely personal level.

6.  Even on issues meaningful only to North Padre Island, voters there are likely to have differing views.   

I think the basic assumptions of the Island United PAC are flawed.

First, they are asking voters to put narrow interests in front of city-wide concerns. That might make sense for a district seat, but not for city-wide at-large seats and for the mayor’s office.

Also, Island United is asking voters to file away long-standing party choices, various competing loyalties beyond a street address, and the aspects of human nature that influence how people vote.  

In suggesting voters put aside all these factors for highly local concerns, Island United is at one time asking too little and too much of the people of the North Padre Island area of Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, U.S.A.

March 19, 2008 Posted by | Politics, Texas | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Picture Of Corpus Christi Bay Fishing Boat And Many Pelicans

Here is a photo of a fishing boat that is returning with its catch from Corpus Christi Bay.

Here is a map of Corpus Christi Bay.

Here is information on destructive fishing practices.

Here is information about the ecology of Corpus Christi Bay.

The boat is being followed by many brown pelicans. Here is information on brown pelicans.

Here is information on visiting Corpus Christi, Texas

I took this picture last week while visiting Corpus Christi.

March 18, 2008 Posted by | Sea Life, Texas | , , , , | Leave a comment

Differences In How Liberals And Conservatives Think

The  following is from a recent article in The Economist magazine about the origins of human morality. This excerpt has to do with the differences in how liberals and conservatives think.  Here is the full article

….. Liberal teenagers always felt more stress than conservatives, but were particularly stressed if they could not decide for themselves whom they spent time with. Such choice, or the lack of it, did not change conservative stress levels. Liberals were also loners, spending a quarter of their time on their own. Conservatives were alone for a sixth of the time. That may have been related to the fact that liberals were equally bored by their own company and that of others. Conservatives were far less bored when with other people. They also preferred the company of relatives to non-relatives. Liberals were indifferent. Perhaps most intriguingly, the more religious a liberal teenager claimed to be, the more he was willing to confront his parents with dissenting beliefs. The opposite was true for conservatives.

Dr Wilson suspects that the liberal package of individualism and confrontation is the appropriate response to survival in a stable environment in which there is leisure for learning and reflection, and the consequences for a group’s stability of such dissent are low. The conservative package of collectivism and conformity, by contrast, works in an unstable environment where joint action, and thus obedience to their group, are at a premium. It is an interesting suggestion, and it is one that plays into the question of how morality actually evolved.

I know this mix of seeking time alone and sometimes finding myself in a confrontation matches some of my own experiences. Its also so that family has not been the center of my life.

Like anything that deals with many people, these findings are generalizations.  Still, they appear to hold some truth.

Any thoughts?

March 18, 2008 Posted by | Politics | , , , | 5 Comments

A Starting Point For Rudeness

Much rudeness comes from the inability to quickly process any mildly unusual or stressful situation. People often lack the self-assurance to devise quick replies to the unexpected. Rudeness seems a better option than appearing silly or feeling awkward.  

March 18, 2008 Posted by | Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Bad Man Exits Elevator Before Woman Holding Ten Bath Towels

You’ll think I’m making this up, but just a few days ago I saw a man get out of an elevator before allowing the woman in the elevator to exit.

This was at a hotel in Corpus Christi, Texas. The man was from out-of-town, so his actions cannot be seen as a reflection on the good people of Corpus Christi.

It happened like this—

There were three people on the elevator. Myself, the bad man, and a woman hotel employee who was carrying maybe 10 bath towels.

We were all going to the lobby.

The elevator stopped at the lobby.

The bad man got off the elevator without a thought to the woman with the towels.

It’s one thing in a very crowded elevator, but when it’s a small number of people you let a woman out first.

Especially if she is carrying many thick bath towels.

Why let a woman out first?

Because it is polite–That’s why. Doing so suggests you were not raised in a cave. It is a small social courtesy that reminds us we live in a society and that the others sometimes come first.

I saw the woman move to get out of the elevator first. It was just the slightest movement towards the door.

She gave no visible reaction when the man bad man went out first. I’m sure she is acquainted with being treated poorly by guests at the hotel.

A measure of a person is how they behave when they have the choice to be either rude or polite– How they act away from home where nobody they know can judge their actions. 

It is good to be polite and it is bad to be rude.

It’s that simple.

March 17, 2008 Posted by | Lousy People | , , , , | 10 Comments

Kids In Corpus Christi Play In Rat-Infested Playground

 

The playground at Cole Park in Corpus Christi, Texas was closed over the weekend.

Children at the playground had been playing with a dead rat.

Here is a story about the park closure

(The above photo is of a rat in proximity to a squirrel. Both creatures are dirty and should be avoided. Here is information about rats.)

I was in Corpus Christi this weekend.

I saw the playground. It’s in a park along the waterfront and near downtown.

The playground was blocked off with an orange plastic mesh barrier.

The rat story was well-covered in both the newspaper and on television news. I’m sure it was also on local radio. 

Yet when I saw the playground on Saturday afternoon, at least 10 people had crossed the barrier and were in the rat zone.   

I had to look twice to believe what I was seeing.

Some of the people in the rat zone were adults. Most were kids.  

It’s possible, I suppose, that the parents had not recently read or seen any local news.

Still, the playground was barricaded. The parents could have guessed it was barricaded for some reason.

I wondered why the City of Corpus Christi had not posted a sign in both English and Spanish notifying people why the park had been closed.

The city park superintendent, a Chris Semtner, was interviewed on TV. He said the city lacked the resources to keep the park as nice and rat free as he would wish. 

I bet Mr. Semtner was telling the truth.

The park is now open again.

Corpus Christi is an excellent city and I will have nice things to say about it in upcoming posts.

However, it does appear that some parents in Corpus Christi lack parenting skills and that the people of that community have not yet decided that children deserve a nice place to play.

Also, based on what I’ve read about this issue, it would be good if people using Cole Park would not leave rat food in the form of trash all around the playground.

This story could happen anywhere in America.

What is wrong with people and why are our priorities so wrong in this society? 

March 17, 2008 Posted by | Texas, Ways We Hate Children | , , , , | 6 Comments

Et Tu, Blogger?—An Ides Of March Blogging Break

 

Even the best of bloggers needs a break sometimes.

And so do I.

I’m blogged out.

Texas Liberal will return on Monday, March 17.

The painting is Death Of Julius Caesar. It was painted in 1798 by Vincenzo Camuccini.

Here is information on the life of Caesar.

Here is an explanation of the term Ides Of March—   

The soothsayer’s warning to Julius Caesar, “Beware the Ides of March,” has forever imbued that date with a sense of foreboding. But in Roman times the expression “Ides of March” did not necessarily evoke a dark mood—it was simply the standard way of saying “March 15.” Surely such a fanciful expression must signify something more than merely another day of the year? Not so. Even in Shakespeare’s time, sixteen centuries later, audiences attending his play Julius Caesar wouldn’t have blinked twice upon hearing the date called the Ides.The term Ides comes from the earliest Roman calender, which is said to have been devised by Romulus, the mythical founder of Rome. Whether it was Romulus or not, the inventor of this calendar had a penchant for complexity. The Roman calendar organized its months around three days, each of which served as a reference point for counting the other days:

Kalends (1st day of the month)

Nones (the 7th day in March, May, July, and October; the 5th in the other months)

Ides (the 15th day in March, May, July, and October; the 13th in the other months)

The remaining, unnamed days of the month were identified by counting backwards from the Kalends, Nones, or the Ides. For example, March 3 would be V Nones—5 days before the Nones (the Roman method of counting days was inclusive; in other words, the Nones would be counted as one of the 5 days). 

March 13, 2008 Posted by | Art, Blogging, History | , , , , | 2 Comments

Life & History Consists Of Broad Themes—It Is Not A Series Of Fragments

The painting above is Twilight In The Wilderness.

It was painted by Frederic Edwin Church in 1860.

Here is what it says about this painting in the book American Art and Architecture by Michael J. Lewis—

Church did not fragment his colors into intense local passages but subordinated them to an overall chromatic scheme…As with a musical composition, there is a dominant key signature against which contrasting harmonies resonate.   

That’s right!—Life is a few broad themes. Individual events take place within the broad themes. These broad themes last through time.

In the 1796 Presidential election, John Adams won nine states and Thomas Jefferson won seven states.

All nine states Mr. Adams won in ’96 were carried by John Kerry in 2004.

Of the seven states won by Mr. Jefferson, George W. Bush won six of them in ’04. ( Pennsylvania was the only state to switch, as it were, from Mr. Jefferson to Mr. Kerry.)  

As a general matter, the Adams’ states were in the North and the Jefferson states were in the South.

These regions of the country had different patterns of initial settlement. In the early years of the nation they had different institutions and different cultures to a greater extent than seen today.

The 2004 results would suggest, with admittedly some simplification, that despite the passage of 208 years, initial differences between the regions have formed broad general themes that have exercised some control of American political history.

Which, I’m sure, is just the point Mr. Church was getting at in his painting.

A great book to learn about the early years of the United States is American Colonies–The Settling Of North America by Alan Taylor. 

Frederic Edwin Church lived 1826-1900. Here is some information about Mr. Church

The above links to Mr. Adams, Mr. Jefferson and Mr. Bush are from the first-rate presidential resources at the Miller Center for Public Affairs at the University of Virginia.  

March 13, 2008 Posted by | Art, Books, Colonial America, History, Political History | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Grocery Store At Night Is A Happy Place

I was in the supermarket last night.

Usually I shop on weekday mornings.

However, last night I was in the supermarket around 10 PM.

I often notice young couples shopping together when I go the supermarket in the evening.

These couples are both straight and gay.  

They often seem happy.

I think maybe their autonomy and their relationships are both still relatively new, and that shopping together late in the evening is an affirmation of both the autonomy and the relationship.

My wife and I have been married 8 years and I am 40 years old.

But I’d like to think that our marriage still has the energy and happiness I see with the young grocery shoppers.  

March 13, 2008 Posted by | My Wife Is The Best Person Ever, Relationships | , , | 2 Comments

Daily Political Coverage Is A La Brea Tar Pit From Which Time Spent Never Escapes

Update 2/23/09–Please click here for an update of the recent big discovery of fossils at the La Brea Tar Pit.

I was flipping channels tonight and came across CNN.

The listing at the bottom of my screen said CNN would be broadcasting Mississippi primary coverage for two hours.

I wondered what they could possibly say about the Mississippi primary for two hours.

Barack Obama was near-certain to win, it was the only primary today and Mississippi is a small state. 

Of course, I knew they had nothing of any note to say.

I watched for 15 minutes. Those are 15 minutes I won’t get back.

Flash–Obama wins as expected and Governor Spitzer likes hookers.

Coverage of any House or Senate races? Maybe a Governor’s race? Coverage of relevant issues?

Sure.

I can’t imagine it is six weeks to the Pennsylvania primary.

What will the cable news networks talk about for six weeks?  

Daily political coverage is like the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. 

Here are facts about the La Brea Tar Pits. 

Sometimes the ice-age beasts would just fall in and sink away.

That was me just flipping channels tonight.

Other times a vicious predator would see a creature that had fallen in and pounce in expectation of a meal.

That’s when you think you’ll find something interesting, but its the same old long-winded junk. 

I’m not a reflexive media-basher.

But this coverage, especially on the cable news networks, is endless and a waste of your time.

Even for the newspapers, which for the most part do try to do a good job and do try to be fair, something new in the Obama–Clinton–McCain triangle does not happen every day.  

If you don’t already, read the international pages of the paper!

At bottom is a picture of the political coverage bubbling up from below and trying to lure you in.

Resist it with a book or by talking to people you care about.

Don’t fall in—at least not every day.

March 12, 2008 Posted by | Campaign 2008, Politics, Things Watching Tv Made Me Think About | , , , , , | Leave a comment