Texas Liberal

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The Things I Have Done With Time Alone—Time Alone Is Excellent

I’ve got a 47 hour stretch with no work and with nobody else at home.

Here is how I have spent the first six hours of this time alone.

First—I got a can of clam chowder for dinner at Walgreens as I drove home from work.

Below you see the food aisle from where I got the chowder at a local Walgreens. They got everything you need in that aisle so long as you don’t need very much.

I also stopped at Memorial Park here in Houston on the way home and took a 3 mile walk on the jogging trail.

While walking I read Mayflower by Nathaniel Philbrick. I’ve been walking and reading on the Memorial Park trail for 14 years so far and have not bumped into anything yet.

There certainly is wickedness at the core of our national history when you read how we double-dealt the native population at every turn in the 17th century.

I’m reading Mayflower to study up for Thanksgiving.

I’m sure that Thanksgiving is not all about food and then rushing out to buy stuff as soon as your meal is over.

Once home I fell asleep for 2 hours and had a dream that I was walking along the ocean in Corpus Christi, TX, and that I saw a seal.

I suppose I had the dream about Corpus Christi because I was recently looking at some pictures of a trip I took to Corpus in 2008.

Visit Corpus Christi for a good time. All the Texas coast has interesting things to see.

Below is the picture I took four years ago that formed the central image of my dream.

There was once a Caribbean Monk Seal that had a range just south of Texas. But people killed them all. There are no seals in the Gulf of Mexico.

Click here to read about this seal and where it lived before they were all killed.

After waking up from my dreamy nap, I busted open the clam chowder for a fine dinner and have now moved on to writing a blog post.

With six hours down and 41 hours to go, who knows what more will happen with my excellent time alone.

November 20, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

To The Extent You Are Able, Avoid Drifting—Seaweed, Driftwood & A Sea Tumbleweed

Above is a picture I took last year in Galveston, Texas  You see that seagull is eating some creature unlucky enough to be caught in a clump of seaweed and washed up on the beach.

This is what happens if you drift through life. You get washed up on the beach and maybe eaten.

Here is a definition of seaweed-

Any of various red, green, or brown algae that live in ocean waters. Some species of seaweed are free-floating, while others are attached to the ocean bottom. Seaweed range from the size of a pinhead to having large fronds (such as those of many kelps) that can be as much as 30.5 m (100 ft) in length. Certain species are used for food (such as nori) and fertilizer, and others are harvested for carrageenan and other substances used as thickening, stabilizing, emulsifying, or suspending agents in industrial, pharmaceutical, and food products. Seaweed is also a natural source of the element iodine, which is otherwise found only in very small amounts.

Here is a link to the well-done Seaweed Site. It will teach you a lot about seaweed.

Here is information from NOAA about deep water seaweed in the Gulf of Mexico.

Below is a picture I took last year of some driftwood that got stuck on shore on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River across from Cincinnati.

I don’t want to be driftwood. That log is marooned.

At the end of this post is a photo I took few years ago of seaweed and what is, as far as I can tell, a sea tumbleweed.

A tumbleweed just blows around.

This picture was taken on the Gulf of Mexico side of North Padre Island National Seashore just outside of Corpus Christi.

Circumstance plays a great part in life. Sometimes you are just out of luck. But to the extent possible, try to take command of your fate. Be more than seaweed, driftwood, or a tumbleweed.

Here is the definition of a tumbleweed—-

“Any of various densely branched annual plants, such as amaranth and Russian thistle, that break off from the roots at the end of the growing season and are rolled about by the wind. 

All photos in this post copyright Neil Aquino

April 30, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Staying The Course—Visit Corpus Christi

Like the ship you see above, I’m staying the course.

There is a lot to do today and so just time for this brief post. Either you run the blog or the blog runs you.

The picture above was taken a few years back in the great Texas city of Corpus Christi.

Corpus Christi is worth a visit.

The Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History was very good.

Thanks for reading Texas Liberal.

February 10, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , | 2 Comments

Do More Than Just Drift

The Galveston County Daily News reports that there is an unusual amount of seaweed washing up on Galveston beaches.

Above is a picture I took last week in Galveston. You see that seagull is eating some creature unlucky enough to be caught in a clump of seaweed and washed up on the beach.

This is what happens if you drift through life. You get washed up on the beach and maybe eaten.

Here is a definition of seaweed-

Any of various red, green, or brown algae that live in ocean waters. Some species of seaweed are free-floating, while others are attached to the ocean bottom. Seaweed range from the size of a pinhead to having large fronds (such as those of many kelps) that can be as much as 30.5 m (100 ft) in length. Certain species are used for food (such as nori) and fertilizer, and others are harvested for carrageenan and other substances used as thickening, stabilizing, emulsifying, or suspending agents in industrial, pharmaceutical, and food products. Seaweed is also a natural source of the element iodine, which is otherwise found only in very small amounts.

Here is a link to the well-done Seaweed Site. It will teach you a lot about seaweed.

Here is information from NOAA about deep water seaweed in the Gulf of Mexico.

Below is a picture I took last year of some driftwood that got stuck on shore on the Kentucky side of the Ohio River across from Cincinnati.

I don’t want to be driftwood. That log is marooned.

Below is a photo I took few years ago of seaweed and what is, as far as I can see, a sea-tumbleweed.

A tumbleweed just blows around.

This picture was taken on the Gulf of Mexico side of North Padre Island National Seashore just outside of Corpus Christi.

Circumstance plays a great part in life. Sometimes you are just out of luck. But to the extent possible, you’ve got to take command of your fate. Be more than seaweed, driftwood, or a tumbleweed.

Here is the definition of a tumbleweed—-

“Any of various densely branched annual plants, such as amaranth and Russian thistle, that break off from the roots at the end of the growing season and are rolled about by the wind. 


May 17, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Texas Progressive Alliance Round-Up—Xmas Mail At Corpus Christi, Texas Trailer Court In 1940

Image, Source: intermediary roll film

At the bottom of this post is the most recent weekly round-up of the Texas Progressive Alliance. The TPA is a confederation of the best political bloggers in Texas.

The picture is of a gentleman sorting Christmas mail at a trailer court in Corpus Christi, Texas in 1940.

Here is some history of trailer courts and trailer parks from the Affordable Housing Institute.

Here is a list of mobile home and manufactured home parks in Texas.

The picture was taken by Russell Lee for the Farm Security Administration. I found the photo at the American Memory Project of the Library of Congress.

Here is a poem I have written about the main reading room at the Library of Congress.

The round-up–

The picture taken by RuTXsharon @ Bluedaze: DRILLING REFORM FOR TEXAS helps you follow the money to see why Governor Perry and others want Texans to keep breathing toxic air.

BossKitty at TruthHugger is proud to give a hat tip to Houston – Annise Parker inherits a City of Progress.

The Stonewall Democrats of Denton County denounce Rep. Michael Burgess for his recent actions against openly gay Safe Schools Czar Kevin Jennnings, at the Texas Cloverleaf.

This week on Left of College Station Teddy covers the dispute in Waco between the McLennan County Republican Party and the Hispanic Republican Club of McLennan County over whether or not the Republicans needs to reach out to minority voters. Also, the tradition of homophobia continues at Texas A&M and the Coalition for Life invites anti-choice and anti-woman Jeb Bush to speak at their annual fundraiser. Left of College Station also covers the week in headlines.

While Houstonians took great pride in the election of Annise Parker as mayor, it was discouraging to see – despite his company’s multi-million dollar contracts with the city and his apparent misunderstanding of their value — that Stephen Costello was elected to city council over a good Democrat, Karen Derr.

Continue reading

December 20, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fishing Boat Picture & Sunday Links

Along with a picture of a fishing boat I took in Corpus Christi, Texas earlier this year, here are some quick Sunday links. 

Overfishing is a global problem says Greenpeace.

Fish Farming is helping people get enough to eat in the nation of Malawi.

Here is information on Malawi.

Fire fighters in Scotland looked for an escaped hamster.

Hamster prices have shot up in China.

A Houston Chronicle poll suggests Democrats will do well in Harris County on Election Day.  

Pollster.com continues to see Senator Obama with a strong national lead.

Here is information on visiting Corpus Christi.

Corpus Christi is a nice place to spend a weekend.

Have a great week ahead and thank you for reading Texas Liberal.

October 26, 2008 Posted by | Politics, Sea Life, Texas | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Photo Of Big Shadows Over Corpus Christi Bay

This is a photo of buildings making big shadows on Corpus Christi Bay. I took this picture last month.

You don’t need to see the buildings to be fairly certain there are buildings near by.

Please click here for my post earlier this week about Sojourner Truth’s comment that she “sells the shdow to support the substance.” 

Here is a map of Corpus Christi Bay.

Here is information about the ecology of Corpus Christi Bay.

Here is information on visiting Corpus Christi, Texas

April 9, 2008 Posted by | Pictures I Have Taken, Texas | , | Leave a comment

Photo Of Seaweed and Sea-Tumbleweed

Above is a photo I took of seaweed and what is, as far as I’m concerned, a sea-tumbleweed.

This picture was taken on the Gulf of Mexico side of North Padre Island National Seashore just outside of Corpus Christi.

Here is a definition of seaweed-

Any of various red, green, or brown algae that live in ocean waters. Some species of seaweed are free-floating, while others are attached to the ocean bottom. Seaweed range from the size of a pinhead to having large fronds (such as those of many kelps) that can be as much as 30.5 m (100 ft) in length. Certain species are used for food (such as nori) and fertilizer, and others are harvested for carrageenan and other substances used as thickening, stabilizing, emulsifying, or suspending agents in industrial, pharmaceutical, and food products. Seaweed is also a natural source of the element iodine, which is otherwise found only in very small amounts.

Here is a link to the well-done Seaweed Site. It will teach you a lot about seaweed.

Here is information from NOAA about deep water seaweed in the Gulf of Mexico.

The first tumbleweed I ever saw was covered with snow at a truck stop in Sidney, Nebraska. Though since it was covered with snow it was not tumbling very much.

Here is a link to a tumbleweed farm in Kansas that will ship tumbleweeds around the world.

Here is the definition of a tumbleweed—-

Any of various densely branched annual plants, such as amaranth and Russian thistle, that break off from the roots at the end of the growing season and are rolled about by the wind.  

March 30, 2008 Posted by | Sea Life, Texas | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Photo Of Old Typewriters And Link To Typewriter History And Facts

Here is a photo of old-time typewriters from the Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History.

Here is an excellent page of history and facts about typewriters.

It seems the idea of the typewriter goes back to 1714. 

The museum is very well done. Here is the link to see what they have on exhibit.

March 22, 2008 Posted by | History, Texas | , , , , | 4 Comments

Basic Questions Of Democracy From Sand Dunes Of North Padre Island

 

I recently read an article in the North Padre Island Moon about a new political action committee called Island United. North Padre Island is part of Corpus Christi, Texas.  

A purpose of this PAC is to encourage island residents to vote as a block in order to influence the outcome of elections for the Corpus Christi City Council and Mayor of Corpus Christi.

(Above is a Padre Island sand dune though I’m not sure how you’d prove otherwise if I’m making its location up. Here is information on sand dunes.)  

Some N. Padre Island residents feel a divided vote from the Island weakens the clout of the community at Corpus Christi City Hall.   

Here is the full article.

Please click here for a political map of Corpus Christi. 

The presumption of this PAC is that highly localized issues should be the guiding factor in how residents of this area cast votes for city council and mayor.  

Given the existing reality that Island voters have a history of differing opinions on who should be elected to municipal posts in Corpus Christi, this seems to be a tenuous assertion.    

What are factors beyond North Padre Island issues that could impact how people there vote for council and mayor?

1. How will candidates for city office administer Corpus Christi as a whole? Just as no man is an island, we can also say that not even an island is an island.

2. While I’m going to guess these council elections are officially non-partisan, voters likely have some sense of the state and national party affiliations of the candidates. Party matters at all levels of politics.

3. Voters may have competing loyalties. Endorsements from local unions or police groups or gay groups may count as much or more to some than where exactly in the city they live.          

4. The race, ethnicity, religious preferences, or gender of candidates may be a positive or a negative to some voters.

5. Especially in the one district-level council seat described in the article, some voters may know the candidates. They may like or dislike the candidates on a purely personal level.

6.  Even on issues meaningful only to North Padre Island, voters there are likely to have differing views.   

I think the basic assumptions of the Island United PAC are flawed.

First, they are asking voters to put narrow interests in front of city-wide concerns. That might make sense for a district seat, but not for city-wide at-large seats and for the mayor’s office.

Also, Island United is asking voters to file away long-standing party choices, various competing loyalties beyond a street address, and the aspects of human nature that influence how people vote.  

In suggesting voters put aside all these factors for highly local concerns, Island United is at one time asking too little and too much of the people of the North Padre Island area of Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, U.S.A.

March 19, 2008 Posted by | Politics, Texas | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Picture Of Corpus Christi Bay Fishing Boat And Many Pelicans

Here is a photo of a fishing boat that is returning with its catch from Corpus Christi Bay.

Here is a map of Corpus Christi Bay.

Here is information on destructive fishing practices.

Here is information about the ecology of Corpus Christi Bay.

The boat is being followed by many brown pelicans. Here is information on brown pelicans.

Here is information on visiting Corpus Christi, Texas

I took this picture last week while visiting Corpus Christi.

March 18, 2008 Posted by | Sea Life, Texas | , , , , | Leave a comment

Kids In Corpus Christi Play In Rat-Infested Playground

 

The playground at Cole Park in Corpus Christi, Texas was closed over the weekend.

Children at the playground had been playing with a dead rat.

Here is a story about the park closure

(The above photo is of a rat in proximity to a squirrel. Both creatures are dirty and should be avoided. Here is information about rats.)

I was in Corpus Christi this weekend.

I saw the playground. It’s in a park along the waterfront and near downtown.

The playground was blocked off with an orange plastic mesh barrier.

The rat story was well-covered in both the newspaper and on television news. I’m sure it was also on local radio. 

Yet when I saw the playground on Saturday afternoon, at least 10 people had crossed the barrier and were in the rat zone.   

I had to look twice to believe what I was seeing.

Some of the people in the rat zone were adults. Most were kids.  

It’s possible, I suppose, that the parents had not recently read or seen any local news.

Still, the playground was barricaded. The parents could have guessed it was barricaded for some reason.

I wondered why the City of Corpus Christi had not posted a sign in both English and Spanish notifying people why the park had been closed.

The city park superintendent, a Chris Semtner, was interviewed on TV. He said the city lacked the resources to keep the park as nice and rat free as he would wish. 

I bet Mr. Semtner was telling the truth.

The park is now open again.

Corpus Christi is an excellent city and I will have nice things to say about it in upcoming posts.

However, it does appear that some parents in Corpus Christi lack parenting skills and that the people of that community have not yet decided that children deserve a nice place to play.

Also, based on what I’ve read about this issue, it would be good if people using Cole Park would not leave rat food in the form of trash all around the playground.

This story could happen anywhere in America.

What is wrong with people and why are our priorities so wrong in this society? 

March 17, 2008 Posted by | Texas, Ways We Hate Children | , , , , | 6 Comments

   

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